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That was the point I think. Just a button with no instructions. Do people blindly click a button for no other reason it is in front of them? Without knowing what it does?



That's it to me.

It proves my personal theory of trust. If you create something so large and peaceful(ish) that people instinctively trust it, you can get away with anything. What if the button ran something malicious on your machine? What if it permanently deleted your account and banned that username from ever being used again? What if that button permanently banned you from reddit?

These are things no one considered, because reddit is just a big, friendly Lenny.

Put that button on 4chan. See what happens there.


> instinctively trust it,

And their own knowledge

> What if the button ran something malicious on your machine?

presses button 'This site attempted to download something to your computer. Download?' no

> What if it permanently deleted your account and banned that username from ever being used again?

'reddit pissing off thousands of users over an april fool's joke' -> I'm guessing not

> These are things no one considered, because

It's not in flash, we know what HTML's limits are, etc etc


You might now that, but do those thousands of other users?


The instructions are right there. Perfect demonstration of what happens when you don't create a linear expectation for the customer. :)


More that that - do they have any curiosity at all? My first instinct was 'what is this?' and I waited and watched.

It's amazing how many people don't have that. Their first instinct is click oh, what have I done?




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