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Thanks for the feedback.

In the case of Lantern, they were taking advantage of a bug in our system. Specifically, they were setting the SNI field (outside the encrypted packet) of a request to look like it was going to an actual CloudFlare customer (e.g., news.ycombinator.com) and then setting the host header inside the encrypted request to point to some restricted site. The bug was that we did not check that the SNI field matched the host header, which allowed Lantern to do what they were doing.

Lantern was not a customer of ours, instead they were exploiting this bug to essentially disguise traffic to look as if it was coming from one of our actual customers. One of our biggest concerns was that this would put CloudFlare's actual customers at risk of being blocked. And, beyond that, even if it weren't being used to avoid Internet restrictions, that someone could effectively impersonate the identity of a customer on our network is, per se, a flaw that we should patch. As soon as we became aware of the issue, we began matching the SNI header to the host header and, effectively, patched the bug.

We've always been very supportive of a free and open Internet. However, even if we support what someone is doing, we can't put our current customers at risk of collateral damage or keep open bugs that allow our network to be exploited.

Matthew Prince Co-founder & CEO, CloudFlare @eastdakota




> Lantern was not a customer of ours, instead they were exploiting this bug to essentially disguise traffic to look as if it was coming from one of our actual customers.

This makes a world of difference.

Just to confirm, does this mean that if the exact same attack had happened, but Lantern had been a CloudFlare customer, you wouldn't have shut them down?


That's a fair response to that case.

Still curious about this quote: “We don’t do anything to thwart the content restrictions in China or other countries,” said Matthew Prince, chief executive of CloudFlare. “We’re a tech company and we comply with the law.”"

So if Lantern were a customer, would the outcome still have been the same?


Well, if Lantern were a customer, then China could just block them like they do for any CF customer they want to block. The reason the bug was allowing people to get around the firewall was because they were pretending to access a site that wasn't blocked, but actually receiving content that was blocked.


I think that's fair and reasonable.




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