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(a) For the same reasons you'd noodle with any other game

(b) For similar reasons to the ones that make you noodle with a programming language you doubt you'll ever use in production

(c) For the same reason anyone ever did anything with a BeBox

(d) Because for some of the technologies/concepts we work with, our dumb game will be the easiest way to get your hands dirty with them.




"(a) For the same reasons you'd noodle with any other game"

I play games for fun and to relax.

"(b) For similar reasons to the ones that make you noodle with a programming language you doubt you'll ever use in production"

On your website, it says that these will actually be real problems for real companies. I would think it's something I would see in production?

"(d) Because for some of the technologies/concepts we work with, our dumb game will be the easiest way to get your hands dirty with them."

Isn't this what open source is all about? Pretty much every job I've ever had involved technologies I could just download or install myself and throw on a Linux box/VM.

I suppose it could involve proprietary technology that I would never see in the wild, but if this is the case, I don't think I could get enough experience with it on your game to prove to a company that I know enough to get a job.


Usually CTFs / wargames / whatever are the only way you ever get to work with stuff like radio or telephony protocols, credit cards, homegrown crypto...

Also you can probably expect things dealing with custom VMs, file formats or networking. Say for instance one of the challenges involves a machine with a broken TCP/IP stack, so you have to write your custom client that can talk to it, how often do you do that in real life? Yet it can translate into useful skills.


Thank you. Exactly this. Try to make a list of interesting stuff you'd like a chance to play around with, in a highly structured environment that handholds you just long enough, and that eliminates all the nonsense required to get dev environments working, or expensive subscription fees, or bankrolls, or laboratories... those are all places we want to be.

Part of the problem I had earlier today was with the words "fun" and "player". I think the words I was looking for were "participant" and "rewarding".


I think the gaming analogies make sense. If you invest time and effort in it, it sure will be more useful in your CV than "Level 80 Paladin" under "Other Achievements"; if not, no hiring manager will ever pass on an otherwise great candidate for not being a part of it.

And it allows outliers to get potentially amazing job offers from your partners.

It's exciting to think that with today's easy access to cheap cloud computing and good process isolation you can have instanced "raids" in the same way as an MMO so I can get my very own version of a challenge that can be as realistic as possible.


> I play games for fun and to relax.

Different people have different definition of fun. Some play Minecraft just to build CPUs out of redstone.

> On your website, it says that these will actually be real problems for real companies. I would think it's something I would see in production?

The key word isn't "production", it's "you". I, for example, don't really expect to ever use Go or Rust in professional setting. Nor do I expect to use Prolog. Then there are real production systems today that use PDP machines (nuclear reactors) or COBOL (banks). I don't expect to work on them either, but sure as hell would like to play with them at some point.

I get the feeling that Starfighter is about giving geeks some hard-core tech game with a side effect of helping them find a job that is not boring.


Whoah. You misread and we miswrote. We are not taking our clients problems and reframing them as games. How boring would that be?

Read "real" here in the sense of "plausible".

Sorry about that.


> We are not taking our clients problems and reframing them as games. How boring would that be?

Not that boring, if your clients have interesting problems.


I'd rather have total complete free rein to pick the most interesting problems I can find. :)




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