Hacker News new | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit login

If we have a society don't like ads (perhaps a subcategory: intrusive ads, offensive ads, loud/bright/aggressive ads, extremely large ads that clutter our cityscape), we could simply ban those categories with law. Honestly I would prefer that. I find the intensity of advertisement to be offensive to my ability to live, my freedom of thought without people spamming images at my face all the time.



The free speech laws in the u.s. are pretty crazy. There was a case of a few pharma salesman who recommended psychiatric meds to doctors for off-label use(not proven by strong experimentation). This is illegal today,as defined by the FDA.They probably hurt many people. In the court they claimed "freedom of speech" and won(it's now going to the supreme court).

In that context, it's hard to see ads blocked by law,even though there's a high likelihood they are harmful to people, and especially to teens and kids.


> I find the intensity of advertisement to be offensive to my ability to live

Other people find Muslims, Jews, Mormons, non-caucasians, breast-feeding mothers, alcohol-imbibers, blondes, Ugg boots, motorcycles, gold watches, crying children, airplanes passing overhead, and dogs to be offensive to their ability to live. Can't ban everything you don't like.

Also, there are already restrictions on advertisements (when was the last time you saw an cigarette ad on television?), and some places are much more restrictive than others.


I wasn't suggesting to ban any of those things, so I don't see how that's relevant aside from careless strawmanning. If a large majority of a society wants to ban something, it can, and often that's a reasonable thing to do -- cigarette ads are a good example.

I simply suggested that, when we're considering hacking our eyes as depicted in the OP to avoid ads, we might consider limiting the ads instead. And that has nothing to do with racism.


Exactly. There is a qualitative difference between what pavel_lishin mentioned and ads, which while originally meant to inform people, now grew into a social cancer.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: