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I, seriously, don't understand how this works, unless your candidates appearance and accent are your main tools for judging a candidate. I would prefer to think that's not the case. If you were teaching a new member of the team to make such a decision, what would you point to?

What's more important, is I don't understand how anyone could possibly improve their 30 second impression.

I guess it could be that you believe this to be the case, and are remembering wrong. Why don't you note this down after 30 seconds, and then check it only after you make a decision to see if you were correct?




> I, seriously, don't understand how this works, unless your candidates appearance and accent are your main tools for judging a candidate. I would prefer to think that's not the case.

Companies would like you to think this, too, and law makers would very much like to think that their rules regarding non discrimination have any effect. The real situation tells another story.

But it's OK, companies can just include a nice stock picture of an ethically diverse group of people in business attire working together, an all is well.


If you're insinuating that this is the situation, then that's incredibly insulting (yeah, got to fess up, we hired that last guy because it would look good in the company brochure, we're just pretending he came across as a genuinely nice guy and someone who'd likely pick things up quickly, we all hate him really!)


You're the one who said that you decide whether or not to hire someone in 30 seconds.


> I don't understand how anyone could possibly improve their 30 second impression.

This is not actually very hard: start with good grooming, nice clothes, posture, confidence.

Of course, this doesn't change the fact that the hiring process seems... odd.


Yes, I admit there is an element of hyperbole (for 30 seconds probably read 30seconds - 5 minutes depending, and that alters if a candidate [ie for a junior position] is nervous and it takes time to get them to relax somewhat).

Appearance is important, and I've never been in an interview situation where it wasn't? Unless you're insinuating choice based on ethinicity (more aimed at _pmf_'s response to your comment). Which is completely irrelevant, as are accent/sex/other discriminatory factors that make zero difference to how someone is likely to work within a team.

As I've said in other comments, there is a serious element of external preselection based on geography and company sector, there's nothing particularly underhand going on.


> Which is completely irrelevant, as are accent/sex/other discriminatory factors that make zero difference to how someone is likely to work within a team.

This is just plain ignorant. Every single place I have worked has had its share of everyday sexism and racism, and that includes how current employees act in hiring interviews. You claim to not notice these things, but what you are saying is that you don't consider those things valid differences that may affect how someone perceives your team or work environment. How can you ever confront issues in your workplace by shoving your head in the sand?


> as are accent/sex/other discriminatory factors that make zero difference to how someone is likely to work within a team

Given the way you're talking about making a hire/no-hire in five seconds, I find it incredibly difficult to buy the idea that you're not taking that into account. You're glorifying the snap-judgment hire.

Because most people do, and a good hiring process takes that into account and counterbalances it.




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