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> I don't think this is a good idea at all. It sounds extremely discouraging.

On the contrary, struggling to get everything done by next week and scraping by with a 55% pass mark is extremely discouraging.

Being able to take as much time as you like to understand the content until you get it all 100% sounds much more encouraging to me.

By way of anecdata, a researcher who had experimented with this approach in australian schools for teaching math came to my faculty and gave a seminar last year. He and his organization found that the students were, as predicted, vastly more encouraged by the mastery learning approach. Actual learning rates were also on average 2x as fast.

> You see this pattern already in compulsory education: 'I don't really get this topic' becomes 'I can't do this topic' becomes 'I can't do this subject' becomes 'Why would I bother?'.

Only because we are forced to progress without even trying to fix "I don't really get this topic".




"Being able to take as much time as you like to understand the content until you get it all 100% sounds much more encouraging to me."

Not sure where you live, but with kids here, the amount of time spent studying is directly related to how close the test is - especially when it comes to subject the kid does not care much about.

People actually open the book at home when the test/oral exam comes clise. Giving them infinite time only ensures they will put off work indefinitely.


> Actual learning rates were also on average 2x as fast.

Compared to a control group, or to the national average? To me, 2x seems extremely low for a group of students receiving special or individualised treatment - but please do link.

> Only because we are forced to progress without even trying to fix "I don't really get this topic".

Not 'only', I disagree.

There are existing systems like this: e.g. certain learn-to-program websites. How many people reach the end point?

Anecdotally, everyone I know who has tried code-learning sites experiences getting stuck (sometimes on a broken problem) and they soon drop out - they don't see the point of progressing any further.


The program was called "maths pathway". There are some charts on their website; now that I look at them it looks more like 4-5x. And that was compared to the same school before the introduction of the mastery learning program, I believe.

> Anecdotally, everyone I know who has tried code-learning sites experiences getting stuck (sometimes on a broken problem) and they soon drop out - they don't see the point of progressing any further.

I imagine the situation would be different with an actual human teacher one could ask for help.




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