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I don't like how it shamelessly piggybacks on Sublime's reputation by using its name left and right and doesn't hesitate to knock it down by calling itself a "successor". This comes across as disrespectful at least.



Sublime is dead. No one is actively developing it.

There's a rich history of piggybacking on dead software, and I (and many others) clicked this link because of that piggybacking.

I completely support and admire someone who is trying to further the development of Sublime without having the original code base.


> Sublime is dead. No one is actively developing it.

This isn't correct, at least according to the author. This was posted in the ST forum on Mar. 18, 2014 [1]:

"From the Sublime office: We are not selling to Github, we are not stopping development of Sublime. As noted by another poster, this is effectively a one man band (I'm here to answer sales questions, process your refunds and get the mail so Jon doesn't have to). The past few months of silence on the development front have been a combination of boring back end work (taxes, new payment platform) as well as a break for the man driving this whole operation. No, we don't currently have a loud internet presence, which is can be an understandable cause for concern-something we intend to address once we move into the production version of 3. There is a vision for continued growth and development, there is momentum behind Sublime Text; it is not dead, just slow.

I'm happy to field any specific questions you might have about the Sublime's future: sales@sublimetext.com."

[1]: https://www.sublimetext.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=15477&...


That was March, it's now pushing September. There's been one similar post since, but no sign of anything actually happening in the background.


Sublime Text 3 Beta was announced in January of 2013. It's safe to call it vaporware at this point.


>Sublime is dead. No one is actively developing it.

No one has to "actively develop it". It's a fully capable editor. It has a great plugin framework and ecosystem. Pending some incompatible OS change, I can use it for the next 30 years (using ST-3 from the early alphas, and it has been rock solid).

For comparison, I also use Vim, and it's not like I use any "new features" in Vim or anything. The most "current" features I use in it are like 10-15 years old.


"No one has to "actively develop it". It's a fully capable editor."

People seem to forget this quite quickly, but what else is needed in ST3 right now? Very little in my day-to-day experience that isn't either solved via a plugin, or mostly trivial. I'd prefer a much more stable piece of software rather than one that's having upgrades thrown at it every month to maintain an 'actively developed' project status.


I'm still using TextMate 1 for pretty much this reason. :)

The only features I'd really love to add to TextMate are the rmate remote launching feature (which didn't work for me when I tried TextMate 2 a couple of months ago) and syntax highlighting for Perl 6 (which as far as I know no editor has yet).


> syntax highlighting for Perl 6 (which as far as I know no editor has yet).

You mean, besides standard vim 7.3? Also, here's[1] an emacs mode.

1: https://github.com/lue/p6mode


I know nothing about Perl, but there is this[1].

[1]: https://sublime.wbond.net/packages/ModernPerl


Updating your editor, adding plugins, or changing to a new editor is never an issue of "fully capable" or "good enough". It's always whether there are new ways to save time.

Lots of people thought editors were "fully capable" before the "go-to any symbol" functionality was introduced (possibly by Sublime). Now they can't live without it.

But besides all that, Sublime has lots of bugs that impact daily work. If it were in bug-fix mode, where plugins were adding new features, that would be fine. That's not the case.


>Updating your editor, adding plugins, or changing to a new editor is never an issue of "fully capable" or "good enough". It's always whether there are new ways to save time.

Well, most people don't update their editor that often. People use Vim and Emacs, even decade old versions of them. Adding plugins, yes, that happens (again, not all the time, except for fiddly people like us I guess). But ST has a fully capable plugin system.

>Lots of people thought editors were "fully capable" before the "go-to any symbol" functionality was introduced (possibly by Sublime). Now they can't live without it

Well, yes, ST3 added that, and I know about it, and I seldom use it. On the other hand, that doesn't mean if I a new feature I like in Emacs or some other editor, I'll change editors just like that.


Several powerful new plugins depend on Vim 7.4


"However, development is still active: when I spoke to Jon today he advised me that not only does he expect an update to the beta in August, he has also started mapping out some frameworks for version 4 which will help guide future development."

https://www.sublimetext.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16517


On the main site, it used the name one. It also says it aims to be the successor, not that it is the successor. I wouldn't feel disrespected if someone did this. I would be a bit bummed someone is trying to take my paying user base but that's about it.


How do you feel about "Open Office" and "Libre Office" piggybacking on the name of the Office suite that was popularized by Microsoft?




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