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If the tool is really good then someone will make it "user friendly" sooner or later

I disagree. User-friendliness is like security: it's not something you can paint onto the system afterwards, it's a more fundamental property. There's certainly value in building experimental systems and tools to explore ideas, but at some point you have to consider the question of getting the ideas out to the wider community. And the key to that is pragmatism.

People clearly aren't as stuck as you think; tools like Ruby or node.js or the cambrian explosion of javascript frameworks show that. But those have traction because you can show people your own rapid success with them.

If someone's rapidly delivering high quality publicly usable applications with a novel technique, people will notice.




> tools like Ruby or node.js or the cambrian explosion of javascript frameworks show that

Ruby appeared in 1990, JS in 1994 (iirc?). Saying they got "widely" (that's a relative term) adopted 15-20 years later is not going to convince me that "people aren't as stuck as I think".

Meanwhile we're still waiting for ideas from '60 and '70 to get to the mainstream. No, I really think people are a bit conservative when it comes to tools they use.




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