Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submitlogin

I don't see anything too surprising here. The big problem is the lack of disruption and innovation due to the government sponsored monopolies of internet/cable/network carriers over geographic regions.

However, it's normal to spend a lot of money on CAPEX and make higher profits on the services after the financing for capital expenditures used to expand the services has paid off. The only people who might find this less than obvious are probably solely from the lean internet business space, and haven't had any real experience in manufacturing or other capital-heavy businesses.




This is the saddest part about it. Cable companies and broadband were once the tip of the spear of innovation in terms of internet speed.

In '95 in Chandler, AZ I went from a 56k to a broadband connection up to 6 Mbps broadband connection (with so few on the nodes then) in one day. It was amazing innovation and almost magical.

The sad part is that the same companies that brought that are the same companies keeping us from leaps like that now, no longer disrupting or innovating, bean counting instead while the US broadband and subsequent innovation possibilities / new markets burn.

The best way to make more money and be more liked as a company if you are in broadband is to jump up a level and put your competitors on their heels by giving more speed/bandwidth, but there are no competitors worthy yet to challenge and shake up internet connections like cable companies did back when phone companies were lethargic.

-----


"jump up a level and put your competitors on their heels by giving more speed/bandwidth, but there are no competitors worthy yet to challenge and shake up internet connections like cable companies did back when phone companies were lethargic." That's not going to happen as long as you have a government-aided cartel. There is simply no way a competitor can come up and "shake up" the landscape because there are so many regulations and red-tape. Those regulations increase the cost and barrier to entry. So unless you have a few billion to throw at the problem, address the source of the problem, regulations.

-----


I agree. I live in a country where external connectivity is done by the cheapest possible nodes...

-----




Applications are open for YC Summer 2015

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Y Combinator | Apply | Contact

Search: