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During college I designed a processor that could do that. It would read like this (assuming A, B and C were constants representing memory addresses pointing to integers):

$300: $(A) $(B) ADD $(C) MUL

And the result would be at the top of the stack.

Not all assembly languages are created equal. ;-)




That has more in common with Forth than most assembly languages though.


That's what I liked about the machine. When I realised that, if I designed a microcoded stack machine, I could make it run something very close to Forth in the 4 months I had to finish it, I knew I had to do it that way instead of a more conventional design (I took some implementation ideas and the assembly syntax from the 6502).

In the end, I wrote an incomplete Forth compiler for it, but I don't know where the floppies I wrote them to ended up.




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