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JavaFX is now a default platform (supported by Oracle) for developing desktop apps. It replaced the clumsy Swing and is showing a lot of promise. http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/overview/javaf...



How widely is this adopted? FX is one of those tools I'm a little leery of because of the possibility it may be abandoned by Oracle if not enough people use it.

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What is the case for desktop apps these days vs web apps? I would love to mess around with JavaFX but really can't come up with a compelling reason to use it.

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If you want to interact with local hardware/storage media, native apps are still easier. "Offline" mode can also be the default, at least for systems that have a local data store. Finally, multicore CPUs may be theoretically exploited with web workers, but it's a lot easier to just spin up a native thread in your Java code.

Downsides are all the usual ones, of course: updates don't happen automatically, you may need some sort of licensing/DRM if you want people to pay for your application, and your testing story is a lot more complex. (Plus: look-and-feel on various platforms, reverse engineering is that much easier, etc., etc.)

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Offline + sync, and higher performance requirements are my two use-cases for desktop apps.

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