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Well if that's the point, I definitely disagree with it.

Some voting systems genuinely are more democratic or better than others in an objective sense. For example, a voting system where one person determined by their status in society has their vote count and everyone elses is discarded is objectively less democractic than a voting system where a ballot is selected at random from all voters and is taken to determine the result.

Neither of these systems is as democratic as a system where everyone votes for their favourite and the one with the most votes wins, and that in turn is not as democratic as a condorcet-loser system, where it's not possible for a candidate that the majority rank last to win.

Just because all of the options have problems, it doesn't mean that there aren't options that are completely dominated by others.




> For example, a voting system where one person determined by their status in society has their vote count and everyone elses is discarded is objectively less democractic than a voting system where a ballot is selected at random from all voters and is taken to determine the result.

Obviously this is true, but this is rarely one of the voting systems being considered in any discussion about voting systems.


I'm responding to your claim that Arrows theorem debunks attempts to paint some voting systems as objectively more democratic or better than other voting systems.

If you think that Arrows theorem really does this, then you should stand by that assertion and defend all voting systems that Arrows theorem applies to as not objectively better than any other voting system that Arrows theorem applies to.

And yes, Arrows theorem applies to Dictatorship/Random Ballot/Plurality/Condorcet-loser methods which are the ones I used in my example.


It applies to dictatorship, but doesn't actually tell you anything about it.


I'm not sure the stochastic method you describe, if followed honestly (a big assumption, in practice) would be less democratic than plurality. Your general point stands, though, for sure.




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