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This might come as a shocker to many people on HN, but many people do not like money.



It's not noble to waste opportunity like that. If he doesn't like money, he should take the money then give it away. A lot of poor people would kill to have that money to feed themselves and their families, or send their kid to school - if he feels so inclined he should take it and give it to them. If not, he's wasting a huge opportunity to either be very rich or very charitable out of some poorly thought-through righteousness.


So you advocate doing things you find morally objectionable while telling yourself that it is the right thing to do because you can give the money away afterwards? That sounds insane to me.


I think it's morally objectionable to waste a rare opportunity when one could just as easily channel that opportunity towards the benefits of others.


This really does not compute for me, so it's bad to stop ruining people's lives if in ruining their lives you could help other people's lives? What if the people addicted and raging over Flappy Bird are the same ones that you think should be helped?


I mean let's just think about it here. Is Flappy Bird really ruining people's lives? Flappy Bird? Really?


You're conflating two acts: he has produced a game, and being addicted to games ruins some people's lives. But if he withdraws his game, their lives don't suddenly get un-ruined. They just switch to some other game.

Basically, you're suggesting that an equilibrium of (1 person-hour stolen by addiction : 1 person-hour of ad impressions given to charity) should be replaced with (1 person-hour stolen by addiction [just to some other game] : 0 person-hours of ad impressions given to charity). Note that there is no "0 person-hours stolen by addiction" option.


Yeah this is basically like drug dealers saying I give all the money to charity.


Actually yes: a casino run by a cult of effective altruists would probably do more for the world than most charities.


He doesn't produce the money. He just takes money from people. Giving it away is not the same as not taking it in the first place.


No, it's not noble, but being noble isn't such a great thing either. It's being true to one's self and following the path you choose. Nothing more, nothing less.


Yep they either have it already or they are fucking idiots. It's a fundamental lack of appreciation for good luck.


Dude common. You have to see it from his point of view. His money and fame aren't coming from a prestigious accomplishment. He probably doesn't want to be known for a flappy bird game for the rest of his life. Imagine being the guy who invented the turd scrubber brush next to the toilet. Everyone owns that brush but would you want to be known for it? Associated with it?


I have to say yes, I would have no problem with being known for inventing a toilet brush, or flappy bird. I'd be proud, even.

I know that people can have strangely fragile egos but the idea of being upset for being known for something, no matter how benign, is completely foreign to me.


? Then why is your account username "throwaway092834".


Because I have found the internet in general to be at times crude, ignorant and destructive. I don't want to concern myself with considering self-censorship to ensure self-preservation. Instead I chose to contribute anonymously so that I may challenge the status quo or speak truth to power without personal concern.

I assure you it has nothing to do with embarrassment. It's unfortunate, but speech often has very serious consequences.


I'm sure our friend the flappy bird developer feels the same way. With insults thrown his way constantly over the game and a massive popularity he wasn't ready for, I'm sure he wishes he was anonymous as well.


We're discussing different things. You're talking about fame and internet comments which have no real impact, at least, not to me. I don't have a problem with people insulting the code I publish under my real name.

I'm talking about the potential for real life harassment (folks calling my employer, showing up at my house, swatting, etc) if I were to say something controversial. I am specifically concerned with being doxxed and criminal harassment.

There's a vast world of difference between people making comments in poor taste over a game and the level people sometimes go to if they engage in an argument and lose in an embarrassing way. I would not recommend that anyone freely engage in internet debates in a non-anonymous fashion.


Flappy bird can make it possible for him to fund his next adventure (or next 10), whatever he chooses that to be. He should think forward a bit more. It's extraordinarily rare to be in the position to take advantage of opportunities like that. What he'd be effectively doing is just handing the money off to Clumsy Bird instead. If he has any dreams for the future, he should view it as funding those dreams; which could be anything from a future game, to charity. Just my opinion obviously.


The disappointing part is that he apparently has such poor self-esteem, he thinks that he will not be able to create anything more popular than this game, even with all the money he's generating.

Regardless of what he builds, what industry he is in, there will always be people there to criticize. Why throw away opportunity that most people wish they had due to something that will occur regardless of the revenue?

Being a martyr only works in certain circumstances. This is not one of them.


> The disappointing part is that he apparently has such poor self-esteem, he thinks that he will not be able to create anything more popular than this game, even with all the money he's generating.

If you look at mobile game development, it's not a bad bet to guess that he won't. It's a big ol' dart board.


I agree. There's a subtle difference between being sincere and being intelligent.


> Flappy bird can make it possible for him to fund his next adventure (or next 10)

If he lives in Vietnam, one day would set him up for the rest of his life.


Actually, it's more like he's going to have to deal with fake people for the rest of his life.


There's nothing more to life than profit. Except maybe regretting your priorities on your deathbed, but whatevs, you won't be worried about it for long.


You and pikachu_is_cool are boggling my mind right now. The guy is having a moderately high amount of money coming in for him now, based on something he did out of passion. There is nothing wrong with money for stability. If you don't like it, give it to charity... or save for health issues, because we all now realize just how pricey a scrape can be in America.


It's not the money itself. It's what comes with the money. Once people know you are capable of making the money, they will never stop stalking you, following you, pretending to be your friend, fervently hating you (this happens SO OFTEN), stalking you, harassing you, etc. No amount of charity donation, hell, even burning all of your money won't fix it.

There is literally nothing coming back from it other than waiting for the hype to die out. And that's what Nguyen is trying to do. Trust me, I'm talking from experience here.

I guess I might be in the minority here, since most people on HN are trying to become the next Mark Zuckerberg with their startups. Maybe they like that kind of attention. However, I, Dong Nguyen, and many people like us do not like that kind of attention. You don't know who your real friends are, and as he put it, it "interrupts my quiet life".


Dong Nguyen lives in Vietnam.


even if you actually hated money, it seems strange to turn your back on your passion because it came with a shit ton of money.


Oh yeah, becoming rich is so great. You can buy whatever you want for people you are not entirely sure are your real friends.


If you literally don't want the money, give it to charity.

Problem solved, get back to your passion.


give it to charity, use it to sustain more development on your games, use it to build a company that can just focus on making your games, use it to fund or invest or donate to other gaming projects... etc.


It's not the money. That doesn't matter. It's that people find out about the money. Once people know you are capable of making the money, they will never stop stalking you, following you, pretending to be your friend, etc. No amount of charity donation, hell, even burning all of your money won't fix it.

There is literally nothing coming back from it other than waiting for the hype to die out. And that's what Nguyen is trying to do. Trust me, I'm talking from experience here.


you're missing the point.


I don't buy the premise of either of those hypotheticals.

Where is he turning his back on his passion? It doesn't sound like the way people are responding to Flappy Bird are the embodiment of his passion he wants. And his passion is in game dev, not an oddly specific passion for riding only the Flappy Bird app to success. Taking it down doesn't mean he can't build different games.

I also reject the idea that it was because of the money alone that he is taking the app down. Money wasn't the only byproduct of the success. Far be it for me to make assumptions, but it may be the "ruins my simple life" levels of baggage that came with the success of Flappy Bird.

My post was attempting to point out that he may have priorities in addition to profit, not that he is anti-money. If you meant to respond to the guy that is actually saying that the money alone could be the problem, perhaps you should move your post.


> And his passion is in game dev, not an oddly specific passion for riding only the Flappy Bird app to success.

I think people here were assuming that his passion was entrepreneurship through game-dev. Because, you know, HN, entrepreneurs, etc. (But also because he did both things in order to ship this game, so it's just as probable he liked doing both of them. He could have given the game away for free, if he thought entrepreneurship was a hassle or something.)


>> Where is he turning his back on his passion?

one passion of many. he was passionate about Flappy Bird, and he is now removing it from the app store all together.

>> I also reject the idea that it was because of the money alone that he is taking the app down.

fair enough and i agree. i really just mean that generally, there are not very many good reasons to outright reject this kind of money.


His Dave Chappelle moment.


I never understood this mentality. Why not give it away? You know how awesome it would be to just walk up to a homeless person and hand them $100 bill? What about stopping by an orphanage and donating a couple grand? Use your skills to better the world.




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