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> A nice post whose essential point is that you should eschew formulaic methods of writing that force you to fit your thoughts into a rigid format and thus hamper your ability to express them in a way that best suits the subject.

Caveat: rigid formats are de rigueur in some poetry, such as sonnets and haiku. Though if press releases were customarily haikus, I think everyone would be happier.




Though if press releases were customarily haikus, I think everyone would be happier.

I'd settle for limericks.

For all the perceived annoyances of rigid formats they seem to have the benefit of forcing you to really think about what you want to say.

I've done a few Ignite talks, and one talk following the pechakucha format, and they are fairly demanding. I generally start preparing for such talks by writing out an essay of what I hope to cover. It's always way too long. So then comes the hard part: culling the cruft so that your limited time is well spent.

I've come to believe that this is a good way to prepare for any talk. First create the Ignite/pechakucha version, then think carefully about what deserves expansion.

I've not done this with essays. Perhaps, though, there's something to be gained by first drafting an essay as a sonnet, or a series of haikus (or limericks, for that matter).

Then expand as needed. If nothing else the final result should have a number of memorable poetic phrases. Or double-entendres.


We're releasing a new Macbook Air

Made of metal with the same Apple flair

But if you ask Steve

If it'll play DVD's

You'll be met with a blank 10 yard stare.




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