Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

I like the idea. Really cool. I've been researching docker a lot lately, and did most of my recent development on Core OS. I do have a question that wasn't immediately obvious: Docker maintains that one should make a container out of every application so that instead of having to install apache + mysql + php in one Ubuntu environment, you'd create three docker containers (apache, mysql, memcache) and run them together and define the share settings, etc. Now here's my question: It seems as if on Stardock, every container would be a seperate (at least) $5 instance? So if I want to run apache + mysql + memcached I'd need to cram them all into one docker container in order to have them on one machine? Or is it possible to use a $5 stardock system and run multiple containers on them, like on Core OS?

Thanks!




There is a new feature of Docker called Links which allows you to organize your stack in multiple containers and "link" them together so they can discover and connect to each other.

There's a great explanation here: http://blog.docker.io/2013/10/docker-0-6-5-links-container-n...


I tried to deploy a Django application with Docker a few weeks ago (using a single image with supervisord), only to discover that, during "docker build", I needed the database already running (so Django could create its database), which was pretty much impossible using a single Docker image and a Dockerfile.

With the new Links functionality, this is much easier, but are you planning to ever have the ability to use a single Dockerfile to deploy an application which may contain multiple images (with links between them)? I want to be able to do "docker build ." and have my application up and running when it finishes.


> are you planning to ever have the ability to use a single Dockerfile to deploy an application which may contain multiple images (with links between them)?

Yes, definitely :)


It is common to include dependencies like MySQL and Apache in the container of your application. Usually people use supervisord with a configuration file to start all the different daemons needed.


It may be common outside of the Docker world, but definitely an anti-pattern within the community.




Applications are open for YC Summer 2019

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: