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This is a tremendous resource, but may I suggest you rather point here: https://www.fpcomplete.com/school/haskell-fast-hard.

It's the same course/series, but with interactivity, so Haskell can coded/evaluated from the browser. In fact, one "dir" up, you will find a bunch of similar tutorials here : https://www.fpcomplete.com/school.




I was going to say the same.. To me the Fast-and-Hard introduction made most sense off all intros I tried (pretty much every one I could find online).

Thumbs-up to FP Complete for integrating it with their tutorial suite!


Regarding the site with the turotial suite: I am not a big fan of harvesting community knowledge, input and ideas and then go commercial

On a second note, how many will use a platform like fpc's, where an external entity has immediate access to your code, for serious projects ?


I'm a big conflicted about that as well.

I think I'm ok with it as long as they have permission/cooperation from the author (a cursory glance looks like they do; could be wrong), especially since the introduction of inline code evaluation makes it so much easier to get into. I know the content probably would have gone into my bottomless "to read later" bookmarks folder if I couldn't knock some stuff out right then and there.

Thinking about it, I guess that's just a licensing issue. Give the author the tools they need to decide how their work can and can't be used.


School of Haskell is actually a website where people can create their own tutorials, so most likely the author added it themselves. (EDIT: I just checked, they were created by user Yann Esposito, which most likely belongs to the author.)

Furthermore, while FPComplete are commercial, I don't believe they're monetising SoH in any way, other than its being good marketing for the company and Haskell in general.


I thought it might be something along those lines. Just didn't have much time to look around.

I would say, though, that it should be (and really is) up to the author where their work can or can't be displayed.

I think it would be good for the community either way, but if an author doesn't want their work in any way tied to a commercial interest, then it's their right to apply licensing in such a way to ensure that, and for others to respect that (though I'm not saying you're implying otherwise; just clarifying).

The monetization here would be brand exposure and site traffic to the domain/website, using the works of others (which I'm not inherently against).


> Regarding the site with the turotial suite: I am not a big fan of harvesting community knowledge, input and ideas and then go commercial

The tutorials are offered for free, right?

And even if they make some money of some purchasable tutorials: they have to pay for hosting too.

> On a second note, how many will use a platform like fpc's, where an external entity has immediate access to your code, for serious projects ?

You mean their Haskell Center offering?

This one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHSBwlm5C8U

I think it is awesome. It makes the simple stuff dead simple (get a decent IDE with one-click web-deploy integrated up and running in <5mins, with an example app); while the hard stuff is still as easy as it was before (you can deploy to your own hardware, using your own desktop text editor and local compilation).

You say "serious", that's a strechable concept. But if serious could mean: doing some green-field web app consulting gigs (which can make serious money); then i think it is already-ready for "serious".

Then considering they are such a young company -- I'm really interested where they will head for :)

I think Haskell Center will turn out to be a game changer, a next-gen development environment (that graciously degrades back into old-skool native code producing DIY deployed stuff).




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