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Time is relative and history is only what has been observed. You only rebase code that has not been seen by others, so the code that was rebased was never history at all, as far as anybody else is concerned.

I don't think anybody ever recommends rebasing public code. There is a reason for that --force flag on git-push advises the user to use with care.

I mean, I could configure my development setup to automatically commit my persistent undo files so that every single keystroke I make is preserved for prosperity... but I don't do that of course. I could also configure my setup so that every time I write out a file it commits, preserving that history forever... but I don't of course. Why should a bunch of temporary local commits be preserved forever?

Using the terminology "rewriting history" to describe rebasing local commits is misleading. "deciding what history will be" is more accurate.




I'm not saying to never rebase. Rebasing has its merits. It's not always the best tool for the job.

>I don't think anybody ever recommends rebasing public code.

This very article says it's acceptable to rebase a public feature branch.

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> This very article says it's acceptable to rebase a public feature branch.

  # optional: feel free to rebase within your feature branch at will.
  #           ok to rebase after pushing if your team can handle it!
It says that rebasing a feature branch is fine if it hasn't been pushed (ie, if it is not public). If it has been, then it is only okay to rebase it if everybody else on your team okays it, which is just common sense. If nobody cares then... nobody cares.

The problem with the article is that it's wording is imprecise.

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