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We are talking about choosing iOS versus Android for prototyping. My point is that the iOS development experience is far superior to Android in particular because of the strength of the simulator. How you "get your code running" is the most important part of the dev life cycle.



On the other hand, for Android it's far easier to get your app running on the device itself. The only thing you have to do is to connect the device to your computer and click Run in the IDE. Beginners can get something up and running within minutes, which includes the time to download the IDE and create a Hello World. The whole workflow runs well, as you get the logs in your IDE or whatever and you can do debugging and so on and it's really not that bad, given that no simulator can match an actual device - there's something to be said about keeping the phone in your hand, rotating it at will and touching it to see how the app feels.

Apple's provisioning process on the other hand is the most painful thing I ever experienced.


> Apple's provisioning process on the other hand is the most painful thing I ever experienced.

Your information is years out of date. In XCode, you click 'use this device for development' and all the provisioning is done fully automatically.

So no. It is not far easier to get your app running on the device itself. That is just false.


I get the impression that everyone in this thread with strong negative opinions, regardless of platform, hasn't spent more than half an hour on the other one.


Perhaps for software development, but not for product development. Often as or more important to a product is finding out how it works for real users, and rapidly prototyping and disseminating builds is a good way to do that.

While software engineering is hard as a discipline, I don't feel it is the hardest part of building a startup.


How you "get your code running" is the most important part of the dev life cycle.

How you *get your code running on a device" is even better. And it's trivial with Android. It's a royal pain in the butt with iOS.


I take it you've NEVER actually developed on iOS before.

The simulator in almost every situation matches the device. And I don't understand how connecting your phone to your Mac constitutes "a royal pain in the butt".


Oh yes I have. Both on iOS and Android.

While suppressing disbelief that this is even something being argued, I present the instructions to run your newly built app package on your Android device:

1) Make sure your the appropriate security options to allow app installs are checked in the phone settings. 2) adb -d install <path to apk> 3) Enjoy the your own app on your hardware you own without asking permission from anybody else

For iOS, start by paying $99 to Apple to register in the dev program. Then go through this tutorial explained with the help of >20 screenshots:

http://mobiforge.com/developing/story/deploying-iphone-apps-...




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