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Show HN: 30-second Slideshows for Hackers (jdan.github.io)
82 points by prezjordan 1541 days ago | hide | past | web | 24 comments | favorite



Hey HN,

I recently started an Open Source club at my school, and one of the key aspects of the club is that I (along with a few others) give quick tech talks. I found that it took far too long to whip up a short slideshow, so I wrote this. Its entire purpose is to allow you to get something presentable and interactive out quickly.

It's sort of a two-birds type deal because we'll be actively working on this project through the club :)

I'd love to hear your feedback!


How does it compare with Pandoc[1], which is the swiss-army knife of Markdown-to-foo converters, and also handles presentations.

[1]: http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/


Pandoc does something pretty similar.

But that doesn't mean there isn't room in the world for both projects. Pandoc strives to be a universal converter, and that means there are certain things it couldn't / shouldn't do. For example, you could add special kinds of slide effects or transitions to Cleaver's markdown dialect that wouldn't be appropriate for Pandoc.


Just looking through the "HTML Slides" examples, seems like Pandodoc is more than capable of achieving what Cleaver does (and much, much more).


You didn't find a solution that met your precise needs, so you started building one. Don't let the fact that other solutions exist get you down.


I feel like this always happens when I'm either done or almost done with my projects as well.


Being so lightweight makes Cleaver far cooler, since that makes it easier to hack on it, and customize it.


Also look at Asciidoc which outputs Slidy slideshows.


Why not try something revolutionary and ditch slides altogether? Use the beamer for a demo or switch it off. Use your bullet point as presenter notes, but do not show them to the audience.


or maybe hand-puppet shadows! :+)

-bowerbird


Exactly. I've been looking out for (and possibly missed) a tool to make a Reveal.js-ish slideshow [1] from just markdown rather than 'HTML with optional markdown in each slide'. This is that.

With Reveal.js you can do:

  <section data-markdown><script type="text/template">
    #markdown slide here
  </script></section>
But that's a bit of a hard-sell when I'm trying to open non-softie eyes to the benefits of markdown-everywhere (as they have to encounter HTML too). So yeah, I realise that a regex that replaces `---` with the above and hoicks it into a Reveal.js template is (almost) all that is needed to achieve what this project does, but I'm thankful for it all the same.

Worth noting that I've also used the `slideshow` gem [2] back in the day. This does basically the same thing as this project, and with the Google HTML5 Rocks [3] theme it isn't bad as a 'just markdown to slideshow' tool, but it was a bit fiddly to get started and 1) that homepage is a big undersell with all the old crappy themes/defaults on it and 2) I think their version of the Google deck is now pretty outdated (was buggy when I used it). Still, worth looking into for Rubyists I think.

[1] http://lab.hakim.se/reveal-js

[2] http://slideshow.rubyforge.org/

[3] http://slideshow.rubyforge.org/tutorial.html5.html#slide1


I would love to explore adding an optional to render a reveal.js slideshow, instead of using my "reinventing the wheel" approach. Shouldn't be terribly difficult, just a matter of adding a new template :)


This is a nice project. I wrote my own version earlier, but it was not nearly as slick! I wanted fancy SVG-based animations, but never got it to a working state.

Coincidentally, I think some subtle animation would be great--maybe just have the slides slide in or out. They are, after all, slides :P.

I currently use a very similar tool written for Emacs's org-mode. Org-mode is incredible. I mostly use it for notes; the slideshows are just another nice feature. I think the results[1] are quite good, given that it's just as easy as this except better-integrated into Emacs.

[1]: http://jelv.is/synthesis-slides.html

I put this presentation together at literally the last moment before speaking--I wrote the last slide just as the previous speaker was taking questions. Despite the bad timing, I think it worked reasonably well.

It's great, but I do sometimes have to modify the CSS for certain slides by hand. Happily, this is very easy, and I have never needed anything complicated.

I use a modified version of an elisp script written by some Googlers[2], but org-mode can output slides with a bunch of other backends[3] like Beamer or S5. You can even use Emacs itself to give the presentation! I've seen a presentation this way and while the aesthetics are questionable, it confers an undeniable hacker panache.

[2]: https://gist.github.com/kinjo/509761

[3]: http://orgmode.org/worg/org-tutorials/non-beamer-presentatio...


I had a play and it seems really neat, congratulations. I ran "watch -n0.2 cleaver presentation.md" to preview changes, but there is probably a better way to do it with some sort of filesystem watcher.


I'll be sure to add a `make watch` command or something along those lines, seems like a no-brainer.


Seems similar to mdpress, a ruby script which I've used successfully.

https://github.com/egonSchiele/mdpress


Very nice. I would suggest adding url support to be able to go back and forth between slides (using browser's back/fwd button), emailing dirct link to certain slides, etc.


I just merged an awesome PR that does exactly this [0]. It doesn't take over the forward/back buttons, which is a good thing in my opinion.

[0]: https://github.com/jdan/cleaver/pull/25


Good point, another similar tool p_slides[1] has just that.

1. https://github.com/munen/p_slides


Why do hackers need this simplistic bullet point slides? Encouraging death by bullet point?

I could understand features like code-highlighting for hackers.


p_slides[1] does just that.

1. https://github.com/munen/p_slides


maybe can add export option viz to pdf


what you need is p_slides[1] - it supports export to pdf (via printing to pdf) as well as syntax highlighting

1. https://github.com/munen/p_slides


this needs mathjax




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