Hacker News new | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit login
WebM for Internet Explorer (tools.google.com)
48 points by captn3m0 1398 days ago | hide | past | web | 46 comments | favorite



How old is this project? That's the old download page from Google, and the old YouTube design. And an old version of Windows.


The installer has this timestamp: 1373509356 (Thu, 11 Jul 2013 02:22:36 UTC). So the last version probably isn't too old. (The timestamp of course is not necessarily correct)


Wikipedia talks of its birthday here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebM


Find the source code and you will have your answer. Click on the installer help link on the download page - I could not find it there.


younger than IE9.


Nice, but ... webm needs to get hardware support (ie so it can be played from smartphones, tablets, raspberrypi etc), until then it's doomed to irrelevance.


Some information about WebM/VP8 hardware support: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebM#Hardware

Notably, "Nvidia is supporting VP8 and provides both hardware decoding and encoding in the Tegra 4 chipset."


Most of the newer Arm chips have hardware WebM support. http://wiki.webmproject.org/hardware/arm-socs .


Just curious: is it possible for the same hardware to support both WebM and H.264?


Most of the main chip makers seem to have agreed to support it [1], but it's taking too much time to bring it to their chips. For example in 2014 I'm not going to care about wide VP8 support anymore. In 2014 I want to already see wide support for VP9, since VP9 is the next-gen codec.

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebM#Hardware


Does it support VP9 and Opus yet?


Couldn't a software decoder be written in Javascript/HTML5? Then no plugin needed - which also means Metro mode support - and it should be passable for most desktops. And if it is choppy then hey, Chrome has built-in support...


A laptop becoming noisy and a webpage that will suddenly become unresponsive? Who is his right mind would implement this on his own webpage? It would only be attributed to your "shitty, slow" site, users don't care what video codec their browser supports..

That said, i had so high hopes for ONE standardized video codec in HTML5, but the w3c/whatwg just fucked it up (or better yet MS, Apple and Co. who couldn't agree on one standard just for profit-reasons).


> or better yet MS, Apple and Co. who couldn't agree on one standard just for profit-reasons

Odd that the two companies you explicitly mention were just fine using h264 and didn't really stand to make money off the decision.


Actually Apple was on record as being against patented tech in W3C standards and reached reportedly reached out to the patent holders to see if they would licence H.264 baseline royalty free and they refused.

Apple also once held up the release of a new version of QuickTime until the Mpeg-LA backed down from the crazy royalty structure they planned for AAC.

But they failed this time, so Apple supporters pretend everything is fine with the current royalty system, and Apple opponents pretend they never even tried.


Spot on. This is the usual endgame for design by committee unfortunately especially when all the players are purely self interested.

Someone needs to say: product X or fuck off.


Video decoding is one of the things you really don't want to run in javascript (although it has been done). Besides a lack of ints, you have no access to SSE and other speedups. This is exactly the kind of thing that nativeclient would be good for, however.


Makes me wonder how many HN readers are in China.


Just give it time - it will get discontinued like every other google project.


Off OP's topic but I find this post on every HN post about Google launching something and frankly this post adds little value to the discussion.

Google Reader is dead and it's not coming back. Reader usage was extremely low and it made no business sense for Google to run it. If Reader actually had enough users, Google wouldn't have shut it down. Many entrepreneurs, including me in the past, have had to take this decision to shut our services because they did not have enough traction. Failure is part of taking a risk and you should be more appreciative of the risk.

I was angry at the Reader shutdown too as I was an avid Reader user. I was quick to switch to Feedly but lately I find myself being infrequent checking my RSS feed. I seem to be getting more and more of my news from techmeme and hacker news. When I talk to tech friends about this, it seems the they were already doing this. The rest of the world had already moved on and I was just late to realize this.

Was I angry at first? Yes. Am I still angry? No.

PS: I'm an engineer at Google right now.


The comment was not just about Reader - it is about fact: http://jensenbox.github.io/timeline/


What fact? The fact that out of hundreds of services, they shut down 12? Even 37signals shut down some of their products and they have very few. Also, this list features google maps api v2 and v1, come on, this is ridiculous. I also see plenty of stuff no one used or that were replaced by services that everyone enjoy (google video by youtube).


They have shut down (among others) Code Search, Google Video, Wave, Buzz, Google Labs, Google Desktop, Google Notebook, Google Sets, Google Listen, Google Reader, Google Squared, Google Catalogs, Google Answers, Audio Ads, Google Base, Browser Sync, City Tours, Click-to-Call, Google Dashboard Widgets, Dodgeball, Jaiku, Google Mashup Editor, Google Directory, GOOG-411, Joga Bonito, Aardvark, Lively, Music Trends, Ride Finder, Google Shared Stuff, Sidewiki, FastFlip, Google Translate API, Writely, Google Health, Google Spell, PowerMeter, Google University Search, U.S. Government Search, Slide products (Disco, Pool Party, Video Inbox, Photovine, Slideshow, SuperPoke! Pets), Google Pack, Google Search API, Image Labeller and Google Dictionary.


Half of those were replaced with better products, and most of the rest were things nobody actually used.

The "Google kills all their products" whisper only started with Reader because it's awfully hard to get anyone mad about the shutdown of Sidewiki or audio ads.


Funnily enough, I actually originally compiled that list long before Reader got shut down: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=3120666 I just added a few more recent things to it since then. So some of us at least were pointing out what was going on long before Reader.

As far as I remember the translate API was the first of the recent closures that really caused a storm.


You should at least do some basic searches on these before asserting them. After said "storm", the Translate API was not shut down as originally announced. It became a paid API[1]

[1] https://developers.google.com/translate/


I'm well aware of what happened. Making it paid was as good as closing it for a lot of the free services that were using it.

The point was that a lot of people were upset about it when the closure was announced, and thus we can see that people have been getting annoyed at Google for closing things down since well before Reader was shut. This is counter to the claim of the Google employee above that everybody loved it when Google canned products before Reader.


A lot of those still exist, just not in quite the same way that they did before or as part of other products. It's a bit dishonest to pretend that all of the functionality in the products you listed above isn't still available (for example, there might not be a "Google Dictionary" product anymore, but Google provides dictionary definitions directly as a part of Google Search simply because it makes a lot more sense to users).


If you took everything Google did and made each of them a separate startup, the vast majority would fail. Just because a new business venture is attached to an old one doesn't mean it's not a new business venture with similar risk of failure.


Just as a heads up, The .idea directory shouldn't be checked into your repo. Timeline project looks really cool though.

Add this to your gitignore: http://gitignore.io/api/intellij


Do we really need to get this kind of comment every single time there's an article about Google? This is getting tiring.


Only when google asks us to trust them to provide a service.


Good thing you don't for WebM seeing as it's an open standard


WebM is a standard.

WebM for Internet Explorer is a plugin. It needs to stay supported.


Or they will use it to track every video you watch and post it on Google+ - for your convenience. All the while serving ads that are suited to your taste based on the video you are watching.


Or they will use it to track every video you watch and post it on Google+

Please don't spread misinformation; this doesn't happen.

All the while serving ads that are suited to your taste based on the video you are watching.

Yes, Google is able to show you videos for free by using ads. Would you prefer that they weren't suited to your taste or related to the video that you're watching? And would you prefer to have to see more ads because they would be less effective in that case?


Naturally, when MS implements WebM, this project will not be needed any longer and can be discontinued.

Seriously, why so much negativity?


Yeah right. More likely this will be discontinued in 3 years time when Google has transitioned Youtube fully to WebM and has managed to convince enough web video to move across also. At that point, WebM for IE9 will be abandoned and a message will be placed on Youtube: "Your browser does not support WebM. Upgrade to Chrome to use Youtube!"


Which will be for the good of everyone. In 3 years time, people should have moved on from IE9.


Totally. Just like gmail, calendar, chrome, android, search, images, drive, and analytics have been.

Disclosure: googler.


It seems you have forgotten about Code Search, Google Video, Wave, Buzz, Google Labs, Google Desktop, Google Notebook, Google Sets, Google Listen, Google Reader, Google Squared, Google Catalogs, Google Answers, Audio Ads, Google Base, Browser Sync, City Tours, Click-to-Call, Google Dashboard Widgets, Dodgeball, Jaiku, Google Mashup Editor, Google Directory, GOOG-411, Joga Bonito, Aardvark, Lively, Music Trends, Ride Finder, Google Shared Stuff, Sidewiki, FastFlip, Google Translate API, Writely, Google Health, Google Spell, PowerMeter, Google University Search, U.S. Government Search, Slide products (Disco, Pool Party, Video Inbox, Photovine, Slideshow, SuperPoke! Pets), Google Pack, Google Search API, Image Labeller and Google Dictionary.


That Google closes some properties is not in dispute. I'm not sure how you got the impression it was. Most of the stuff you listed suffered from a combination of {nil or close to nil traction, better alternatives outside Google, duplicate functionality to other Google products}, and almost all of them operated as services, unlike the plugin under discussion.


The number of desktop-based products closed by Google is far more significant, as a percent of those released. Basically, excluding obviously Chrome, they are shutting down every single desktop tool (toolbars, plugins, desktop search, enterprise syncing tools, etc.).

I don't think it's unreasonable to forecast that this IE9 plugin might get discontinued at some point for a combination of { no traction, better alternatives from ffmpeg/vlc, irrelevance of VP8 when VP9 is out }. At the same time, I can't see it as a crucial part of any business (I doubt there will be any WebM-based business soon, for now), so I don't see a real problem in getting/using it while it exists.


To add to the list of reasonable reasons for discontinuing products, there's also the question of relevance. If WebM support is added to some future IE version (not out of the question if WebRTC in its current form catches on), will the WebM plugin get added to that list? That's exactly what happened with things like Google Desktop, which I used to love but became completely superfluous when windows added a decent file search. Not everything needs to last forever, especially for desktop utilities and libraries, where the most useful tend to be folded into the OS itself over time (see: "sherlocked").


>it will get discontinued like every other google project

Yes, of course it will get discontinued at some point. Just like any other software project by any other company.

This particular project is similar to Chrome Frame. It's a stopgap solution. It adds/polyfills functionality which should be there out of the box. It's supposed to lose its raison d'ĂȘtre. That's what we're all wishing and waiting for.


Or they will make it play an advertisement before you can watch anything.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: