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"As a vegetarian, I don't like how you priced your hotdogs" should not weigh too heavily on any of the hotdog makers in the room. This comes up quite a bit here, for example when people who do not own businesses opine that $200 a month for a Business plan of SaasFoo shocks the conscience.



After some thought, I realized what was going on in my thought process. The problem isn't the price, the problem is the feeling that somebody is trying desperately to add bells and whistles to their thing to inflate the price.

Then I saw that there's no book book with the $30 option and it was just the final nail in the coffin. I think if that was the only option, or it was listed first, I would buy it. Especially if there was no patronizing "one month of something" and copy that tells me I am a bad person for not wanting the bells and whistles.

But here's the thing, my feedback reads: "As your target market[1], I don't like what you're selling me".

[1] assuming the target market are people in the process of writing and publishing a self-published (e)book


But here's the thing, my feedback reads: "As your target market[1], I don't like what you're selling me". [1] assuming the target market are people in the process of writing and publishing a self-published (e)book

No. The target market is "people in the process of writing and publishing a self-published (e)book - who are willing to buy a ebook at price point $X".

The market of folk who would buy the book at $10 is probably larger - but I guarantee it's not 10 x larger.

And if you're not going to get at least $30 value from the book - it doesn't sound like you're the market.

(Also - as an aside - I get the impression that you think that paper is the largest cost of a paper book. That for $30 price point paper would be expected... The thing is that the paper bit is the cheapest part of a book. On a normal bookshop book it's about 10% of the money you pay.)


However small percentage of the costs paper is for book it is very large percentage of the value (at least for a percentage of the customers).


You might also be falling victim to what I call the "Cialdini effect."

After I read his Influence book I couldn't have a normal interaction with sales people for a long time, since every time I'd recognise the techniques I would feel manipulated and angry.

It wasn't until a few years later that I actually could be impressed with the finesse of their execution while evaluating the morals of their actions separately.


The potential problem with having multiple tiers of products is that people have naturally formed negative reactions to up-selling from previous bad experiences with other vendors. Which then interacts with preconceived notions of what a self-published book might be like.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upselling

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trojan_horse_%28business%29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bait_and_switch


Oops, I meant to upvote you, but I think I accidentally downvoted you. I think the distinction from what patio11 is talking about here is important — not all complaints about pricing structures boil down to "this is too expensive."




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