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So much this.

When I come to your site it is very unlikely I'm looking for any sort of long term relationship. What I want is access to the information I'm looking for as quickly and painlessly as possible.

Secondly, your app probably wants various permissions on my system. No.

Third, why the hell would I want hundreds of apps grunking up my menus?

Fourth, you already have my whole screen, what more do you want?

So yeah, you make my experience of your site worse and probably even reduce your already small opportunity to advertise to me.




I agree with all points. What I'm wondering is, what percentage of mobile users are like me, you and almost everyone that commented here? Does the proverbial "average user" share the sentiment? My guess is no, or else the marketroids that push the app agenda would have gotten the message by now.

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I don't think marketroids care about reality based things like data -- the good ones does, but not the kind that is employed by the daily mail.

The daily mail is actually better because they _explicitly_ wrote "you wont see this again for 7 days", which is insane, since if I didn't want it the first time I don't want it the second time.

As for quora, well they are run by people who wants to make the world a worse place to be, so no surprise there.

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> As for quora, well they are run by people who wants to make the world a worse place to be, so no surprise there.

I actually quite like Quora. Any particular reason for the hate?

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Forced registration to read it would be my guess. Nothing else against it really personally. Some people just don't like having to create an account to (passively) participate in a community. I read hacker news for well over a year before I decided to create an actual account for posting.

If I feel I reach a point I can contribute something useful to a community, that is when I create an account. However, I think forcing people to create an account either detours some or nudges others to participate more (whether they have anything useful to contribute or not).

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Even then, creating an account to post to a community is an absurd idea in the first place, why do you need my email, name, dob, and social security number to post on a bloody internet forum and contribute content to your website?

There is your usual suspects: combat spam and the anonymous coward effect but even then there is many ways to combat these without invading my privacy / lessening my security online.

I think it mostly comes down to lazy analytics and shitty metrics. "we have xx registered users",90% of those are made up of shell accounts and inactive users but at least the numbers sound good.

This app thing is just the new incarnation of shitty metrics and the same old story of

developer: oo new tech, me want to makey makey.

boss: can you justify it, isn't our mobile site fine?

developer: waaaaaah

boss: ok ok, jesus, fuck. Just, we'll have to make sure users actually install it though, or we'll be out of the job.

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They attempt to break the web by app-walling user supplied content.

Imagine having to register and install a special program for each website in the world -- the WWW was made to make it possible for everybody to read it.

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The mobile market has been exploding. Even if you did a lot of stuff wrong it's almost impossible to not have had a growth curve. My feeling is that most content-driven apps would have been more successful as mobile sites, but that it's impossible to derive this from statistics due to the unstable pattern of the market as a whole.

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It's actually much harder to monetize mobile web than to monetize in-app.

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Until they look at bounce rate before viewing content vs. number of downloads of app. That should be a big indicator of whether this works or not.

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Which is a weak signal at best when you define actions like "Cancel to continue" (http://idontwantyourfuckingapp.tumblr.com/post/50193815132/t...).

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The conversion rate should still be fine for the apps who are asking for the installation.

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There are a lot of web designs that the average user finds annoying, which is in the same category as this - 'I don't want a splash page, I don't want your artsy and convention-breaking layout, I don't want your app - I just want to find what I need without anything getting in my way.' It can be hard to find web pages that don't violate some useability principles that seem pretty obvious.

Maybe it's just cargo-cult programming.

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Fixed elements on a web page are my biggest pet-peeve. Just eats away at the precious vertical space on my monitor.

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Fifth - if I do give in an install the damn thing you're just going to want me to update it all the time anyway

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and fifth, I do not want your app to litter into my notifications or eat RAM/battery on my (android) phone.

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