Hacker News new | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit login

I'd say there's a major flaw here - "the new world of concurrent web backends" - If now was 1995 I might agree with you, but having concurrency in web-app servers is not new. The lack of concurrency in test/demo app situations is totally understandable, in a production environment you'd have to be completely bonkers to think thats ever useful. I also agree that "having to deal with loadbalancing" is something that most people don't get and shouldn't really have to get, but when the way you do loadbalancing is so fundamentally flawed that its worse than Round Robin DNS, you also clearly don't understand it.

To be fair, I have to say I meet people all the time who don't understand it at all and think $randomcrappything is great at loadbalancing. If "connections go to more than one box!" is your metric, then yes, thats loadbalancing. My metric is "Do you send connections to servers that are responsive and not overloaded, maybe with session affinity" and in general most HW loadbalancer products since 1998 have supported that. So if you're not better than 1998 technology, you may want to reevaluate your solution.




I'd say there's a major flaw here - "the new world of concurrent web backends" - If now was 1995 I might agree with you, but having concurrency in web-app servers is not new.

Sadly, concurrency is relatively new and unfamiliar territory to many in the Ruby on Rails community.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: