Hacker News new | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit login

"2.4.1 was rejected on Monday night for a reason that didn’t make sense (the reviewer said it wasn’t sandboxed when it was)."

I've had some incredibly fun (sarcasm) experiences with the review team for the MAS over the last few months. Reading that sentence got a belly laugh out of me.

The first major WTF that I had with the review team was their insistence that an app I had submitted was calling a private method. A method with the same name was present in an included library but rather than explain that to them I found it quicker just to remove the library (a workaround was simple enough). The hair pulling started when they again rejected the app for exactly the same reason. As the app relied on a heavy 3rd party framework it took a lot of investigation to understand what (wasn't) happening. Finally I took out a $50 tech ticket and after a week the engineer explained that the review team's tool for checking API usage was broken and it had nothing to do with my app.

The next time the review team rejected an app (seemingly within minutes of it going into review) because it was "producing garbage output". This time I just did a cursory review of the app before using another $50 tech support ticket. The app was sometimes writing files with the format somefile.ext.sb-randomstring. I suggested to the reviewer that the app was messing up an atomic write and given the sb- part of the filename had something to do with sandboxing. A week later the engineer explained what it was to me -- which was exactly what I had suggested.

My advice to anyone dealing with this is to spend zero time talking to the review team. Don't resubmit (unless it's something really obvious) and don't try to reason with them. Filing a $50 tech support ticket will basically guarantee that someone capable of passing the Turing test (have a conversation via iTunes Connect and you'll understand what I mean) will look into the problem. The tech support team will usually ask the review team to expedite your review once the problem has been solved -- something you'll rarely get if you ask yourself.




Finally I took out a $50 tech ticket and after a week the engineer explained that the review team's tool for checking API usage was broken and it had nothing to do with my app.

Did Apple at least refund your $50 when they discovered it was a bug in their own software?


No, neither time. You do get a certain number for free per license so neither of those were actually out of pocket.


  the reviewer said it wasn’t sandboxed when it was
I'm afraid I'm utterly ignorant about Mac programming, but how is that even possible? I thought sandboxing was built into the execution environment, not the app.


The app requests sandboxing. That request then causes it to be run in a sandboxed environment. Apps can refrain from requesting it and run non-sandboxed, but such apps are not accepted in Apple's store.


Ah. Somehow I assumed app store apps were built into a different format than "regular" apps.


I can see why one might think that, but it's not the case. The core requirements for the store are optional things that can be added to any app: sandboxing and code signing. Apple just enforces those by refusing to accept any app that doesn't have them.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: