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I don't really understand this article. He was living in his Jeep? Didn't he bother making friends? I thought the whole point of college was to engage in Lord-of-the-Flies-style social hacking? That "one red paperclip" guy needs to teach this kid a thing or two...



Some people spent their high school years learning programming languages and reading books written by dead guys.

To these people, living in your jeep is a LOT less scary that asking one of your classmates if you can sleep on her couch.


Dude, he's getting a PhD in Sociology. For the sake of his research, I hope he's spent some time getting over his wealth anxiety and gaining a few social skills.

This is a prime example of why Peter Thiel and David Sacks wrote The Diversity Myth. (Note: I have neither a positive nor negative view on the contents of that book)


I agree this article was a little weird. But it can be hard to make friends across economic disparities. You can't join them for lunch out, or a weekend ski trip, or chip in towards the keg. The one red paper clip guy worked because it was a novelty. The rich kids at Stanford would eventually get tired of buying this guy lunch in exchange for paper clips or whatever, and he'd get tired of asking.


No way. Really rich people LOVE hard-working poor people -- it plays into the whole theory that smart, hard-working Americans will always come out ahead. Also, really rich people often understand that they are simply not as focused or motivated as the hard-charging kids who NEED to make their own money. This is useful for future business ventures, or if the family company needs to hire some young smart people.

The kids in this article sound totally lame, and seem to use their lack of income as an excuse for hating their wealthier peers. Yeah, a lot of rich people are utterly hilariously out of touch with the world, but that doesn't mean they wouldn't want to be your friend and do things with you. If you feel there is some sort of major tension, it's got more to do with you and your insecurities than with your affluent peers. In fact, if some rich kid were to act like a total snob to you because of your lack of money, there is ALWAYS a MUCH richer kid who would love nothing more than to have an opportunity to say to the snob, "dude, shut up - my family can buy yours ten times over." (True story.)

This isn't some theory of mine, either -- I'm pretty much the poorest person in my neighborhood, which has taught me quite a lot...


> I agree this article was a little weird. But it can be hard to make friends across economic disparities. You can't join them for lunch out, or a weekend ski trip, or chip in towards the keg.

Sure you can. Rich people can do the same sorts of things that poor people do (movies, keg parties, or even opera/symphony for example). (Yes, poor people have keg parties.)

Yes, there are rich people who only want to do "rich" things, but ....


Maybe he doesn't want to live in Saskatchewan.

http://oneredpaperclip.blogspot.com/

I thought the whole point of college was to engage in Lord-of-the-Flies-style social hacking?

Please tell me more about this thought. I tend to think that the reason the low-income student should go to Stanford if admitted is precisely in order to meet a lot of students who are much better off. But I didn't try it myself (I attended a state university where I could afford to work my way through my degree program, knowing I wouldn't have any help from other family members), so I'd learn something from your experiences if you kindly shared them.




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