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The article looses a lot by being so vague about which jobs could easily have been held by high school grads that instead requires college degrees.

One reason I could think of is that as college education become more readily available for still more people, deciding not to go (gut feeling, isn't it really more often a decision not to go, rather than to go?) is a progressively more meaningful filter.

I'm sure a similar shift happened as high school became ubiquitous - then high school became a requirement for some jobs that were previously held by those with no high school.

This is generally a good thing, it's an artifact of society as a whole becoming better educated. The main problem with college is that it hasn't really caught up to it's new status as "general" education, rather than "elite" education. That said (I'm not american so not intimately familiar with the system), isn't it entirely possible to get a decent education (although with little "elite" signalling value, it would "tick the box" for college degree on the types of jobs the article refers to) from a state or community college and not have a lifetime of debt to deal with afterward?




I went to a state-run community college on Georgia's HOPE scholarship. I went in to learn network administration, but it ended up patching all the holes left by a K-12 system that was broken long before immigration in the '90s stretched it to the breaking point.

It's popular to joke about how easy it is to get a college education in this state, but I don't think Georgia's $400+ billion GDP amid the century-long economic turmoil of this region is a coincidence. PINES[1] probably helps, but I think Georgia's focus on getting everyone into some sort of college is key.

[1] http://www.georgialibraries.org/public/pines.php


> isn't it entirely possible to get a decent education from a state or community college and not have a lifetime of debt to deal with afterward?

This is the key. I know so many people who insisted on going to an out of state of private school and now are deep in debt with poor job prospects and not many marketable skills, when they could have gotten the same education from a state school, and have poor job prospects and not many marketable skills but not be deep in debt.




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