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> (don’t worry, no death by Powerpoint here)

well, technically PP wasn't used here, but the unnecessary transition effect makes me feel like it was.




"reveal.js" is a fucking plague, and image macros are the new wordarts.

Welcome to PP 2.0, browserdeath edition.

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I actually find presentations like this to be an easier way of obtaining information than long blog posts.

"WHO WROTE THE 'DEATH NOTE' SCRIPT?" released on HN earlier this week was very interesting but I kept losing my place down the page.

http://www.gwern.net/Death%20Note%20script

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> I actually find presentations like this to be an easier way of obtaining information than long blog posts.

I have little issue with presentations in and of themselves, although generally speaking either the presentation is missing most of the relevant information or it's just a more annoying format for a blog post.

I do have an issue with reveal.js which is the epitome of "style over substance" presentations full of pointless rotations and intractable multi-dimensional navigations, and with overuse of image macros which are the lowest common denominator of the modern web and the most information-free way to waste time and bandwidth.

> "WHO WROTE THE 'DEATH NOTE' SCRIPT?" released on HN earlier this week was very interesting but I kept losing my place down the page.

A bigger difference is that this piece happens to have actual content. And dense one at that. It's not trivial to read let alone skim.

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I agree with you. Do you think presentations like this have any place, perhaps more to large groups of people at HN London rather than a singular user?

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Oh yes, the format is OK as a support for a talk (although this one precisely has way too much text crammed in some of the slides), and of course the navigation is not an issue when the creator is the one showing the deck.

I also think presentations could work better as a single-consumer format if "presentation notes" were available alongside, expanding on the slide itself with what the presenter would usually talk about. Essentially a slide becomes a "hook", a header for a page of content. And the presentation itself becomes a sectioned/paginated post. But I don't know any presentation site which provides a good interface for that (I don't believe speakerdeck does anyway).

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Interesting, I think you could take that further for group presentations. Say when you are actually in a presentation - the 'presentation notes' are sent in real-time to mobile devices.

Could you explain further as to what the interface would be like? If the presentation is full screen, where would the notes be? Somewhere off-page that you could pull in if needed?

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> Interesting, I think you could take that further for group presentations. Say when you are actually in a presentation - the 'presentation notes' are sent in real-time to mobile devices.

That's a pretty interesting idea, and it could help e.g. non-native or disabled audience follow the talk.

If the on-device UI is done well-enough, it could also help with the usual "ask questions at the end" format: tap the text and jot down a quick reminder, and at the end of the presentation the things you tapped can be displayed for review or questioning.

> If the presentation is full screen, where would the notes be? Somewhere off-page that you could pull in if needed?

Sure, but I think it'd work better if the interface was closer to "presenter view", with the slides taking only part of the screen (say half) and the notes/accompanying text taking the rest. Then you could have something similar to e.g. Reeder/Mac's interface, using the spacebar to read "the next thing", either scrolling down the text (if not all of it can be displayed) or switching to the next slide (if the text is under a page or its end has been reached)

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It makes me a little bit sea-sick, watching the transitions slide around each other.

I don't need a long blog post, but my eyes can jump from paragraph to paragraph much faster than (apparently reveal.js's?) slidey animation thing.

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> It makes me a little bit sea-sick, watching the transitions slide around each other.

me too. I had to close my eyes for the spin after a few times.

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