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Resources to Learn Programming in Java, Python, Ruby or Javascript (zappable.com)
83 points by arikrak on Nov 23, 2012 | hide | past | web | favorite | 21 comments




Ah, but that's the issue. That list is huge. It's incredibly intimidating for a non-programmer (at least, for the non-programmers I've talked to). The matrix approach is much better in terms of "OK, here's where you start", though it also has flaws ("says who?" "what if I already know a bit of ..." "what if I want to ..." etc etc. True personalisation would be the next step!)


Resources to learn programming. (using Python): https://www.edx.org/courses/MITx/6.00x/ Also MIT 6.01 on OCW.

Have no interest in Java or Javascript, sorry, but they will be very easy to learn after these courses.


404



Take a look at Pineapple (link below). I've actually put a huge amount of time creating an app which I feel is 'missing'... basically a database of tutorials and places to learn from (as well as resources and assets).

Furthermore, my goal (and my meta description actually), is web tutorials and resources that don't suck. Check it out, I've spent a lot of time ensuring everything is of quality, and currently there are 1300+ resources and growing daily

http://pineapple.io


Linear approach works better for a beginner where a definitive path of progress is laid down. Your site will be useful to people who can pick and choose which beginners can't, owing to their lack of familiarity with the jargon and the ecosystem.


I actually just added a wiki for this exact purpose, but had a problem deploying it.. spent 2 hours debugging, eventually rolled back with zero patience. I know what is wrong now and I will do it on monday. But yes, I understand the problem, and it is my goal to fix it with the wiki as a supplement to the resources.


I believe you should change the "Good Free Book for Teaching Programming" into Learn Python The Hard Way for Python.


I looked at it, but I thought it had too much of an emphasis on just copying code , while "How to Think Like a Computer Scientist" lets you play around with examples right in the browser.


There is a coursera class for python that is leaps and bounds better than whats currently on codeacademy. Much better organized, video lessons, better tools, and better feedback system

https://www.coursera.org/course/interactivepython


That could be an option for the video section, but I was unable to access the course. I think they only allow access while its in progress.


Here are some other great free Python ressources: http://www.awaretek.com/tutorials.html http://pythonbooks.revolunet.com/


The Ruby Way is missing in the Ruby section. One of the better Ruby books out there


You shouldn't talk about Ruby learning resources without referencing Why's poignant guide (yes it is still maintained):

http://mislav.uniqpath.com/poignant-guide/


I mentioned it in my post (http://www.zappable.com/2012/11/learning-ruby-and-rails/), but I think the Humble Ruby Book is clearer to actually learn how to code.


Best place to learn Python? The official tutorial. Period. http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/


http://www.learnstreet.com is teaching Ruby, Python, and JavaScript for free to beginners as well.


I think these are among the the best resources for a beginner to learn programming, so I put together a quick table of them.


Chart for Learning a Programming Langauge


JavaScript the good parts?

How about the Groovy language?




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