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What I think you don't understand is that such considerations are irrelevant to someone who considers the distribution of closed source software to be wrong.

Let's change your argument:

Safe driving advocates should understand that safe driving only works with types of commuting paths are relatively short.

In many places where the commuting is rather long, usually only reckless driving offers a way to get to work.

In the end, if you are able to maintain a job by driving safely or recklessly depends on your commuting path.

Does this offer a valid argument for driving recklessly and putting other people in danger?

Of course, I know you find this ridiculous because you don't consider distributing closed source software to be wrong, therefore it's stupid to compare reckless driving to it. But if you're trying to appeal to the people who do find it wrong, that argument simply doesn't make sense.




People who find it wrong usually don't have to sustain a company.

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So what you're saying is that it's pointless to argue with such people because they're not arguing logic but rather dogma? I agree.

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Would you support slavery if I showed you that it's much more efficient than paying people?

It's not about being illogical. It's about attributing different values to different things. You may call it dogma if you want, but it's not different than any moral principle.

Maybe your morality is purely based on logic, and if so I'd be genuinely interested in knowing more about it. Or maybe you're amoral, I don't know. But most people have some core guidelines in which we base our decisions (and build logical moral codes upon) which can't be explained logically.

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>Would you support slavery if I showed you that it's much more efficient than paying people?

No.

>It's not about being illogical. It's about attributing different values to different things.

No, it's about extremism. Dogma. Closed source is the ultimate evil and will destroy the world! It's not practical. Really, why would absolutely everything need to be open source? The percent of people who actually read the source or actually change something based on it being open source is line noise. Practically speaking, there's little difference in the freedom because it's not exercised in most cases. And in the cases it would be, access to the source code can be (and is, very often) bought.

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