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> A traditional college education probably is better than MOOCs, but the economics of MOOCs are so good that it just doesn't matter.

How can you say this, and then not understand why so many people come out negatively? Some people feel that the extra 30% matters. You clearly don't, but disagreeing is different from not understanding.




The extra 30% matters--that's a fair point.

For instance, if I was getting spinal surgery, I wouldn't want the guy that only got 70% of the maximum benefit from med school (if you could measure that). Still, there are lots of professions that do not involve life and death situations and programming is one where you can generally screw up a few times when you get started, provided you're not building life support software. Everyone has to start somewhere.

Re: not understanding--you're right, when I said "I really don't get why", I didn't mean that I really don't get why, I just meant that it disappoints me that apparently rational, educated individuals would come out against a general push towards free, massively delivered education for the world because it's not a perfect alternative to a massively expensive entrenched alternative.

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For me, what pisses me off most about MOOCs is the rhetoric. They're basically devaluing future reform by claiming it's here now... but this isn't education reform, nor is it even new. The novelty is in scale.

It doesn't surprise me that most people don't recognize this. Most people haven't actually thought through the nature of what they seek to replace. They've grown up on broken education--content delivery--so they think that broken education's problem is simply one of scaling the delivery system. They've grown up in a country where education is a minimal priority financially, so they think that the solution to its problems is economic.

Those of us who have been fighting for education reform since before Salman Khan are watching this and seeing the opportunities we worked so hard to wedge open slip away. Instead of breaking the classroom-as-church-sermon paradigm, MOOCs have enforced it with an iron fist. Instead of creating legitimate ways of evaluating student progress, MOOCs have doubled down on the worst methods of doing so. Instead of helping us recognize that education is not just a funnel for the job market, MOOCs have emphasized it as its only real purpose. This is anti-reform. It's like saying you're fixing Big Brother by installing more cameras and wiretaps.

Does it have a benefit? Absolutely. A lot of the technologies and methods being developed by MOOCs are things we could use if we actually had real reform. Khan is trying, in his own way, to do that; that's why he's working on a brick-and-mortar school.

It also has an interesting risk. The liberal arts of universities have been a refuge for political dissidents in developed, educated countries. They provide a decent level of security from which loud criticisms can be made. Arguably, the blogosphere has obsoleted such agitators, but what if it hasn't? How do we account for this in an age of MOOCs?

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For someone without the means, isn't 70% better than 0%? Education probably shouldn't be an all or nothing proposition.

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What does "without the means" mean, specifically? We've spent the last hundred years working to create opportunities for people without the means: community colleges, scholarships, federal grants, state grants, distance learning, textbook reform. This is just another iteration on that.

I'd rather see people calling MOOCs 70% and flogging them towards figuring out how to provide the remaining 30% than sit around praising their 70% and being contented with that.

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> I'd rather see people calling MOOCs 70% and flogging them towards figuring out how to provide the remaining 30% than sit around praising their 70% and being contented with that.

Praising progress and providing constructive criticism need not be mutually exclusive.

> community colleges,

Show me a community college course on computer science that's better than or equal to the least of these:

https://www.coursera.org/category/cs-theory

> scholarships, federal grants, state grants

Affording tuition is not the only constraint that limits people from attending a traditional university.

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> Show me a community college course on computer science that's better than or equal to the least of these:

> Affording tuition is not the only constraint that limits people from attending a traditional university.

When I say that 70% is not good enough and HEY maybe we should try for 100%, you tell me that MAYBE praise progress then.

And then you come around and say HEY my examples like community colleges and scholarships are only 70% maybe try for 100%! Does this sound familiar yet?

> Praising progress and providing constructive criticism need not be mutually exclusive.

So provide some constructive criticism, rather than saying "70% is awesome because CHEAP so who cares about quality".

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Here's some constructive criticism for you: turn the anger down a bit. It's a conversation, not a fight to the death. Second, learn how to write coherently. It helps if you want to be understood.

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