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If I were in this position, I'd have run an IRCd from static boot media. I don't think Petraeus should've been fired for being unable to keep his pants zipped, but I do think that a CIA employee who doesn't know how to cover his tracks properly when having an affair needs to be shown the door ASAP.



> I do think that a CIA employee who doesn't know how to cover his tracks properly when having an affair needs to be shown the door ASAP.

Apparently, you're not the only person who feels that way. From an interview on "Fresh Air" last year with Dayna and Robert Baer, two former CIA clandestine service agents, came this bit of institutional wisdom:

    GROSS: Yeah, sometimes when people start seeing each other who work together, they try to keep it secret for a while because they don't want everybody in the office to know. Did you do that?
    
    Ms. BAER: A little bit, to some extent.
    
    Mr. BAER: We used good tradecraft.
    
    (Soundbite of laughter)
    
    Mr. BAER: Car pickups, dead drops and the rest of it. You know, in the CIA they say if you can't carry on an affair in secret, you're not worth your salt.
    
    (Soundbite of laughter)
    
    GROSS: Is it that common that there's sayings about it?
    
    Ms. BAER: Yes.
    
    Mr. BAER: Oh, absolutely.
    
    Ms. BAER: Absolutely.
    
    Mr. BAER: I mean the divorce rate there must be astronomical. You know, they won't - that's a secret too, but I'm sure it is.
http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?story...



That's known as keeping the honour to yourself.

It means that you've become a liability to the organization that you serve so it is better to leave out of your own accord than to be thrown out. This is the quickest way to kill the storm. Imagine what it would have been like if this had been drawn out over many months, it's bad enough as it is.

Resigning looks so much better than being thrown out so if someone has messed up but on the whole has done an ok job (or in the case of Petraeus even a pretty good one) then giving them the option to bow out rather than to be tossed under the bus is a good thing. For everybody involved.


Resigning is honorable, but he might have kept his job if he made a public apology. The American people are generally quick to forgive public figures whose sins have come out and then confess. Lance Armstrong, on the other hand, is not likely to recover his image.


Right, and Korea was a "police action" and the Iraq war ended in May 2003.


exactly, being human is eminently forgivable, but being a total idiot about keeping it even slightly covert is reprehensible for anyone with his experience.




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