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They're also made out of better stuff; most laptops are not built from magnesium and carbon fiber.

I don't know about fewer screws though. I've disassembled quite a few laptops and I'd say Thinkpads have above average screw counts. It's part of the reason they don't come apart on their own.




Although I wouldn't generally recommend to a normal person, this being hackernews, I can confidently recommend a Clevo. These laptops come with reference hardware which means that you don't need to wait for your manufacturer to release their versions of the latest drivers. This becomes a problem especially with display cards, with AMD/ATi and Nvidia releasing new drivers quite aggressively while the large companies take their own sweet time to customize the drivers to their hardware. Another thing I'd like to add is that as far as my knowledge goes, these guys use copper heatsinks/heatpipe system. Sure, you pay for it but good hardware makes for a longer lasting laptop.

The service manuals for Clevo are incredibly detailed, possibly almost as much as those Thinkpad ones. Reiterating again, the sheer joy of installing reference drivers over the course of years definitely outshines any advantages that I'd get by saving a few hundred bucks if I'd have gone with a popular laptop brand.


Most laptops can have vanilla OS installations with OEM drivers, unless something changed with laptops in the past couple of years that I didn't notice.

Generally the first thing I do with a new laptop is repave with fresh OS, etc. Weird hardware is relatively rare.


Most may. But there are some laptops which absolutely require the laptop manufacturers drivers for the equipment to work. THAT is very annoying.




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