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People need to be aware that using childish clauses in licenses can have legal repercussions. This is not about "Free Software" or "Open Source" either, because that same clause can get you in trouble even if it comes in the EULA of a proprietary product.

The article was itself childish, but then again, it's a personal blog, not some kind of official statement.

> it discourages people from contributing

True, but my perspective is different - what discourages people from contributing are ego-driven testosterone-filled spoiled brats. Incidentally that's why we also have so few women contributing.




The contributions from ego-driven testosterone-filled spoiled brats are significant.

Indeed, I would go further and say that the fruits of Open Source are in significant part the result of young men trying to impress and outdo each other in mental contests and show each other who's smarter (aka whose organ is bigger). This kind of competition is driven by testosterone.

And we all benefit as a result.

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>> "People need to be aware that using childish clauses in licenses can have legal repercussions."

Please name a case.

Name one single case where this holds true.

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I'm not disagreeing with the message of caution. But it could have been said much better.

> True, but my perspective is different - what discourages people from contributing are ego-driven testosterone-filled spoiled brats. Incidentally that's why we also have so few women contributing.

Ego and Testosterone in the same sentence - that has to be bad! But it is a different conversation altogether.

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Contrary to popular belief, neither ego nor testosterone are absent from women.

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So I guess the projects led by developers that are kind and helpful to a fault, of which there are quite a few in my experience, must have all the women contributers funnelled to them. I haven't seen that that's the case so I'm not so sure about your theory.

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> because that same clause can get you in trouble even if it comes in the EULA of a proprietary product.

Could clauses like these get you the author in legal trouble? Or it's just you the incautious users?

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