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Don't tell us about "false marketing" on amazons side.

Did you notice how Phil Schiller showed the iMac on Stage? He always talked about how thin it is and how incredible but he never showed the thicker part of the iMac.

Also noticed that Apple ALWAYS showed every iMac from the side on there website? Since the new iMac, there is only a 20° angle to the iMac, so you can only see the thin border, but not the thicker part behind it.

Oh, btw: have fun with your iPad mini.




Check out the iMac gallery on the Apple Store, the fifth and sixth pictures show a side view. I would expect the show they put on to only provide the best views of their products but at least you can find better pictures on their site.



I'm pretty sure they've included side views in their main product galleries before.

I've looked at the previous lines, but I was surprised (and entirely lost interest in the product when it was clear they weren't willing to present it honestly) when this gallery was so misleadingly shot.

Steve Would Never Have Let It Happen®.

Seriously, their main selling point is "it's so thin" and they won't even show us how thin it is? That's not clever marketing, that's idiotic.


It's also a weird marketing tack to take since "thinness" doesn't really matter on a desktop system. It's another example of Apple's impressive ability to shift the conversation (as polshaw mentioned above) when their products don't come out on top in traditional specs.


The iMac is in a sub-market of desktops (call it All-in-Ones) where design aesthetic does matter. A lot of people have said to me that they're thinking of buying a new iMac, more so than the previous generation, which shows the thinness does resonate with people.

Obviously, this is a small part of the overall desktop market, but it is the bit that Apple is interested in.


I think the iMac "thin" hype was in part a setup to the iPad mini reveal. "See how thin the iMac is...see how thin the iPad is...oh look there's an iPad mini hiding behind there!"


Dude, be civil.

> Don't tell us about "false marketing" on amazons side.

Why not? I thought it was interesting.

> Did you notice how Phil Schiller showed the iMac on Stage?

Yep! I didn't think it was especially relevant in the discussion thread for a story about Amazon marketing the Kindle Fire, though...

> He always talked about how thin it is and how incredible but he never showed the thicker part of the iMac.

He did, but not for very long.

> Also noticed that Apple ALWAYS showed every iMac from the side on there website? Since the new iMac, there is only a 20° angle to the iMac, so you can only see the thin border, but not the thicker part behind it.

That is weird.

> Oh, btw: have fun with your iPad mini.

No plans to buy one.


i should have added a smile to the last sentence. Wasn't meant to offend you!


Heh, s'ok. Smiles on HN get downvoted doublequicktime.


but he never showed the thicker part of the iMac.

He did turn it full sideways to the camera and revealed its bulging back. You can't show off its full thickness any more than that.

It wasn't on screen that way for as long as the "ooo!" moment of the brightly lit knife edge, but it was there for all to see.

Unrelated random thoughts on iMac thickness:

It is really just an aesthetic. The foot print of the machine can't be thin because it would be too easy to knock it over backwards. You can't stick it to a wall because there would be no place for your legs. That leaves aesthetics.

Consider the angles from which you see an iMac. Generally you are mostly in front. As you move off axis beyond the screen perimeter, the edges become visible. These are indeed thin, and deliberately visible in their glorious thinness. If your desk is against a wall you will never see the bulge. If you are in an office with the desk facing the door (always my preference) the bulge is not readily apparent to people entering because of its gradual edges, it is only from about a 30 degree angle of view around the rear sides that you can really see it, and that is the region where you are walking around your desk to sit down, not one visitors inhabit.

You end up with a computer that looks thin. Does it really matter if it isn't?


From my viewpoint, he very carefully moved it between pre-determined camera angles.


I'm sure there were marks on the table showing exactly where to position it at each pause. (Yep, as axx points out, you can see him check the base on the table before turning.) It's that kind of production. People physically present in the audience obviously get varying angles, but unless he is panning it around for everyone you can be sure it is planned for the camera.

Ok, got the keynote downloaded. My memory is off. He doesn't pause at exactly a side view. He passes through it twice, and the split screen shows the bulge pretty well, when they are showing the side, but obviously a viewer's attention could be on the other half of the split.

To my additional surprise, the first glory shot of the thin edge does show about half of the bulge. He could easily have stopped a few degrees sooner and shown no bulge. I wonder if that gives the viewer the belief that the bulge is much smaller than it is. That may be reading too much in.


yes, pretty sure there where predefined marks to place it perfect for the video. if you look closely you'll see how Schiller looks to a monitor and corrects the angle slightly.

It's just a little detail in opinion, but it shows how staged all those presentations are and you can't blame amazon for doing the same.


Agreed both sides have their fair share of false marketing but did you really have to add the last paragraph? Everything else about your counter is reasonable, no need to be snide.


This apparently worked. I've only heard about the new iMac from apple.com and until reading this post I had no idea that it wasn't as thin as it appeared. I was so amazed when I saw it.




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