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I noticed you mentioned scala on the server side. Does your comment about static typing being a hindrance apply to scala?

I would also argue that static typing provides a self-documenting benefit that is easy to forget, making it easier for someone unfamiliar with the codebase to understand what is going on. When I'm doing maintenance work I often start at the point of failure and work backwards, and it is very helpful when I can immediately identify what a variable is supposed to be representing.




"I would also argue that static typing provides a self-documenting benefit that is easy to forget"

Ditto. For me that's by some way the biggest advantage of typing, with refactoring/navigation being the next biggest.

I do wonder if some of these newer languages are going to make the self-documenting aspect even stronger though. I'm speaking here of optional typing and/or implicit implementation (Greeter implements IGreeter if it has the correct methods). For me this will let me put type information and abstractions (interfaces etc) only where they make sense.

Compare that with what you get in current static languages, where projects I've worked on that also use IoC have so many interface-implementation pairs that it becomes difficult to spot the important abstractions.

Interesting times ahead I think.


I haven't used Scala for application development (I'm talking about apps with a UI here). I really like it on the server -- easy to refactor, self documenting, great implicit typing so it feels like a "safer, faster" ruby or python.

I'm just really happy with Scala. Highly recommended, and the Akka library (Erlang for Scala, essentially) is fantastic.




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