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I'd like to see a TeX -> MathML program come about. With web publishing, the standard A4 page approach isn't optimal anymore; further, MathML just seems so cool (even if it's still really in it's beta or alpha stages). I know TeX has so many things you can do with it, but this article brings up a great point: with people moving a large majority of their work to diminutive tablets, a 4GB TeXLive distribution probably won't work.



The simple answer to that seems to be to not move to working on tablets. For LaTeX editing, I can't see any advantage that a tablet would offer over a notebook, and there are a lot of disadvantages.

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An article that appeared at the same time on HN's front page points out some of the benefits:

http://yieldthought.com/post/31857050698/ipad-linode-1-year-...

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He does not compare the tablet with a notebook for the use case of interest here, writing TeX documents (or something similar), and the disadvantes for notebooks that he gives would seem to prevent you from working with a tablet too (e.g., using a remote server for compilation will also help with the battery life of a netbook, and you may even be able to swap the battery).

The major problem in writing TeX on a tablet seems to be the keyboard: It takes away screen space (which is already hard to come by, since ideally you would have the source and the compiled output displayed side-by-side), is much less convenient to use than a physical keyboard, and (usually) makes it more difficult to get to special characters which are really important for TeX: \, {, }, [, ], and so on.

I can see how it could be usable for copy-editing, but for longer writing a notebook beats a tablet any day.

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There is no shortage of TeX ↔ MathML conversion tools and solutions, one spectacularly prominent example is MathJaX (http://www.mathjax.org/) which can take TeX input and output MathML (for browsers supporting it) or do its own rendering into regular HTML.

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Mathjax is pretty cool but it's also pretty slow if you have many formulas. While it's loading the page keeps rescrolling up and down because the document grows and shrinks. I started noticing the load after already ~30 formulas, quite big formulas though.

Also the distribution is a bit bulky, it consists of over 30000 files. You can remove many of them but then you also loose a big part of the compatibility. While speaking of compatibility, some formulas look kinda weird, but those are very few

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