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I think this may be a case demonstrating the adage, "The perfect is the enemy of the good."



That would be the case, if "The Elements of Style" would be a good book.

Read your favourite authors (be it fiction like Jane Austen or non-fiction like the Economist). Pay attention. See what makes their styles tick.


if "The Elements of Style" would be a good book...

--Awkward on many levels


This is not helpful, and it might make some reluctant to contribute. Please don't do it.


Good writing is an art, which benefits from but does not require perfect grammar.

Attacking grammar--which is the topic of this sub-thread--is missing the point.[1,2]

_____________

[1] And by perfect I mean pedantic. [2] Off-point critique + sweeping conclusions = logic fail


Next time, we talk in German.


Fair enough. I think "The Elements of Style" is aimed more toward people who must communicate effectively with the smallest number of words, where efficiently conveying information is the only priority.

Obviously someone writing creatively is free to ignore these journalism guidelines. On the other hand, many well-known writers first learned their craft at newspapers where the principles of Strunk & White (or its predecessors) were fully accepted -- Samuel Clemens and Ernest Hemingway to name just two.


> Fair enough. I think "The Elements of Style" is aimed more toward people who must communicate effectively with the smallest number of words, where efficiently conveying information is the only priority.

See http://www.economist.com/styleguide/introduction, if you want to communicate succinctly. The Economist's style is just one possibility, but they do manage to write short and efficient pieces.




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