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> Likewise there's nothing stopping you applying an emailed patch in your local copy and then pushing to github.

Right. Now let's say you are the one not using github (you use raw git), and you want to send a patch to somebody using github ("not git"). As TFA notes, either nothing gets done (you send-email and the other guy just doesn't see/want it) or something has to give, you have to create a github repository with the result of your patch or the other guy has to learn git-am.

That could be fixed if github had better mail integration (and more generally more hooks for standard git behaviors) and you could essentially create a pull request by git-send-mail-ing some sort of special address @github. And the pull request got its own mail thread (so the initial sender got replies & al without needing to go on github).

As far as I know, that's not the case.




That's something that github could easily add, given their current level of resources. The million dollar question is "why haven't they added it?" There are at least two possible answers: not many people have asked for it, or to increase lock-in.

It's a feature that github SHOULD add. There are some people who want it, and these people are the type of people that can become quite vocal proponents or detractors.

More importantly it signals quite strongly that github intends to become a good citizen in the nation of git rather than trying to appropriate it.

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> There are at least two possible answers: not many people have asked for it, or to increase lock-in.

Watching Zach Holman's various presentations on Github and how they work interally provides a third one: since Github uses pull requests internally (and new githubbers are probably github users in the first place) nobody has any issue with not supporting `am` and `send-mail` there, so nobody went and built support for that.

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As TFA notes, either nothing gets done (you send-email and the other guy just doesn't see/want it) or something has to give, you have to create a github repository with the result of your patch or the other guy has to learn git-am.

Or you know he checks his email and takes the patch. When you use github you are using git. There is no way to commit from the github website, so if they have code on github then they must have interacted with git. Now that we have established they interact with git then they have the capability to interact with the patch feature if they so desire.

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Actually, you can commit from github. Go to any file and hit Edit at the top right. It's a single file editor, so don't expect much out of it, but it is conceivable for someone to contribute without using git.

And to your point, you cannot add files via github.

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