Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit login

For instance, if Microsoft wanted to learn about technical or trade secrets of competitors communicating through Skype (say, a couple of start-up founders), now they're free to do it.

Is that any different from using, say, Gmail or Google Apps? Not saying that Google is looking at that data but this is a problem with essentially every web-based communication tool. People shouldn't have an expectation of privacy or security just because it's a company they know/like or it's a popular tool.




It's a risky situation, if you ask me. Consider the data that tools collect on us:

- location and contact history (cell phones)

- message history and address book (email, social network)

- interests/activities (calendars, event tools, feed subscriptions)

- browsing history

As an engineer, think about the evil fun you could have with that data. You could really mess somebody up if you didn't like them.

-----


While technology makes this easier, it isn't new. You could hire a PI to follow the CEO of a competitor. You could break in and bug their offices.

None of this is legal, and if discovered there would be a legal case to answer.

-----


I've long thought that Google's ability to track searches from Microsoft IP addresses was one of the reasons for the development of Bing - i.e. Bing's value is, in part, that it plugs an information leak and siphons other leaks into Microsoft's data mine.

-----




Applications are open for YC Winter 2016

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: