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> Download and runtime speed are not a problem on the Desktop.

When I'm stuck in the wilderness with nothing but an atom based netbook tethered to a patchy and expensive GPRS connection, I beg to differ.

Anyway, it isn't just about your bandwidth to your desktop - if each user is transferring less it can be significant for the server-side.

If they make proper efforts to maintain 1.9.x for a goodly amount of time the "hitting a bug in one version but not the other" issue shouldn't be more significant than the current "hitting a bug in a third party library (jQuery) which I don't have the expertise to locate+fix" issue that we already have to consider. Of course the "if" at the start of that sentence could be cause for concern but I think the jQuery project has done well enough at QA in the past for me to give them the benefit of the doubt (or at least to reserve judgment) at this point.




>When I'm stuck in the wilderness with nothing but an atom based netbook tethered to a patchy and expensive GPRS connection, I beg to differ.

Who cares about outliers like that? How many people using your webpage are connecting like that? 1%? 0.1%? Less? Are you really going to make major decisions based on 0.1% of your users?

And what's more, if you're building a website for that kind of usage, you probably shouldn't be using a big javascript library in the first place. And the people on those connections should experiment with scriptblocking and selective script whitelisting so they're in control of their poor connection.

Know your audience, I think, is the most important factor when deciding how to go forward.

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>When I'm stuck in the wilderness with nothing but an atom based netbook tethered to a patchy and expensive GPRS connection, I beg to differ.

That's not a Desktop. That's a cellphone conection and processing power that, by todays standards, reassembles a phone more than a laptop.

But even on mobible, latency is a much bigger problem than file size.

>"hitting a bug in one version but not the other" issue shouldn't be more significant than the current "hitting a bug in a third party library (jQuery) which I don't have the expertise to locate+fix" issue that we already have to consider.

All things being equal, you have twice as many chances of hitting a bug with two code bases than with one.

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