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One of the biggest problems Java faces for real adoption amongst tech people is still the perception (and I am not sure it is entirely flawed either) that it is insecure. Yes Flash is just as bad if not worse, but we are stuck with them because they are so ingrained within the Internet. Java never caught on, and I know that when I see a Java application I let out a huge sigh and go download and install Java again.

I've gone so far, and so have many of my friends, to remove Java completely and it is not like I am missing out on anything important! I just don't trust Java. I don't trust Flash either, but that is nicely sandboxed in Chrome, sure exploits may exist there, but at least it will be a lot less likely, and Click to Flash helps as well!




I'm baffled by this statement. You seem to be drawing comparisons between Flash and Java when Flash's use cases would describe about 10% of the use cases of Java. Are you referring to Java in the browser only? Or are you referring to all Java? In the world of non-browser software, the statement that Java is perceived as "insecure" is simply not true.

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Apart from the risks inherent from running random programs via a web browser (drive by download etc). I don't see how Java is less secure than (say) a C++ or Python application?

On the client side, Java will check certificates of Applications before executing and even then will ask permission. It also has sandboxing and security policies built into the VM which should be harder to break out of than those imposed on Native code (all else being equal).

On the server side, the libraries are fairly mature (hibernate etc) and are generally designed to avoid classic traps like CSRF and SQLi etc.

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> Java never caught on

There is a whole world beyond the desktop. Java 'caught on' in a big way.

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"One of the biggest problems Java faces for real adoption amongst tech people is still the perception (and I am not sure it is entirely flawed either) that it is insecure."

That hasn't been my experience at all. Java's failure to catch on in the browser is essentially 100% due to performance issues. The dreaded "See a gray box, have your system freeze up for 3 minutes while applet loads". I don't think there is a widely held perception that Java-in-the-browser is inherently insecure, especially when compared to Flash.

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The biggest problem Java Applets had and still have is that it's so much pain to update the Java plugin that most users are left with old versions that have documented exploits.

I don't get why it doesn't auto-update itself - if browsers like Chrome or Firefox can auto-update themselves automatically, why can't the Java plugin?

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> I don't get why it doesn't auto-update itself - if browsers like Chrome or Firefox can auto-update themselves automatically, why can't the Java plugin?

It's better that they don't. There are often subtle differences between versions. Sometimes it causes some JDBC drivers to fail. Sometimes it can cripple entire platforms like 1.7 did with Solr for instance.

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Even between minor versions / security updates?

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I don't remember which exactly version I think 1.6_10 and 1.6_21 had some differences in way Hibernate communicates with JDBC, so basically app worked on my colleagues computer but not mine. It took quite some time to figure out this problem.

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