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3D nano-printing (plus.google.com)
23 points by 6ren 1085 days ago | 10 comments



It's not that I'm not impressed, but this is closer to micro-printing than nano-printing, looking at the "20µm" line at the bottom of the image.

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That 20 µm is the size of the whole structure. Look at the details (like the placement of the nose), this precision is in the order of 10-100 nm.

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When I wrote the above comment, I was ballparking it to be around 100nm, which I think is closer to µm than nm.

Looking a bit closer at it, I would say that the bands you see on the feet and body seems like the "precision" of the system. These are around 4 pixels wide. The 20µm ruler is 84 pixels wide, giving us 20µm / 84pixels ≈ 0.25µm/pixels.

So the band is 4 pixels * 0.25µm/pixels = 1µm. (Assuming my premises are right)

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That's pretty amazing. I had the privilege of demoing repraps to a Vienna UT researcher a while ago, and he reciprocated by giving me and my friends a tour of the 3D printers at their institute. The 2-photon printing facility was already in place (and oh my is it impressive), but it hadn't made a lot of interesting stuff at the time - I think they were focusing on fabbing organic molecules at the time. I'm pretty sure it wasn't as fast as this - 4 minutes for a sculpture of that size, at that level of detail is pretty great.

That was about 2 years ago now. Very glad to see they made such great progress in the meantime (-:

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source & video: http://www.tuwien.ac.at/en/news/news_detail/article/7444/

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In this picture: http://in.reuters.com/news/pictures/slideshow?articleId=INRT..., are there gaps in the bridge structure? It's very impressive.

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Is this the same as CUBE. mentioned in the above

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No, not remotely. Cube is a traditional 3d printer with a resolution of 0.25mm. This is 3d printing on the atomic scale effectively; many, many orders of magnitude higher resolution.

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Not true at all: the scale bar says 20um, which is 0.020mm. This is 20,000 nanometers or about 200,000 atoms. Not even remotely atomic (nevertheless impressing, because it is really 3D).

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Oh wow, my math was way off. Thanks for the correction.

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