Hacker News new | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit login

2 years ago, while working at a SoC vendor, they were explicitely taking into account WebM support for their next generations of chips: not having hardware decoding for a major web codec would be a great failure: with Google + Mozilla + Opera we could see almost 1 billion users affected by this. This is a make or break to have design wins.

A SoC lifecycle can take 5 years to materialize in customer shipping hardware. Yet Mozilla is giving up before collecting the fruit of their previous policy (no system codec).

That's a shame.




> Yet Mozilla is giving up before collecting the fruit of their previous policy (no system codec).

The bigger issues are that

* Google never followed through on its declaration it would remove H.264 from Chrome, which would have made almost 50% of browsers that don't support H.264.

* Flash never followed through on its declaration it would include WebM, which would have enabled WebM in IE and Safari and made it possible for YouTube to go WebM-only (on desktop).

Mozilla using system H.264 codecs on mobile (not even desktop) doesn't matter at all compared to those.

-----


What good is WebM support in the SoC, or what effect does it have, if there is zero content out there using it anyway? If WebM video would be popular by any measure, this wouldn't have happened.

Note that there are SoC already out there that support VP8/WebM. As far as I know Tegra 2 is one of them. What does it change? Nothing. All those chips support H264 as well. So H264 is what content producers use.

-----


There is content. Youtube has started pushing html5+webm videos to modern webrowsers without flash installed. This includes Android 4.0+.

-----




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: