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Imagine if Dropbox were a non-US company. That section you just argued could be easily misused to block that site. After all, you can share your files on as many computers as you want. Clearly it will all be music and movies. People that want Dropbox taken down only need one or ten examples. In a popular enough website, it would be easy to find some example people that have broken the ToS and uploaded copyrighted conent onto it and shared it with their friends. They could even plant those people!

Oh, but they broke the ToS, that means they're not following what the web site's purpose is? Well, now maligned websites just need to have a ToS that says "don't do bad stuff", and they're fine!

See where I'm going with this?




I realize that laws can be twisted by clever lawyers but I still think its quite a stretch to claim that a Dropbox-like site could be said to have its primary purpose be infringing copyrights.

For one thing, those files aren't publicly available by default. If they are publicly available, then the Dropbox team is probably already monitoring those files. If they are not monitoring those files then (this part is controversial...) maybe they should be investigated for copyright infringement, as long as they maintain due process.


> If they are publicly available, then the Dropbox team is probably already monitoring those files.

I doubt that they are. Copyright is a matter of permission. How would any third party know who has permission to do what?


But, should the entire website be taken out of a dns just because one/ten people using the website are using it in an illegal way? That's what SOPA will do, and that's why it's bad.

Due process is good :)




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