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"Remind me to call my wife when I leave for work" - http://imgur.com/Y3Y3s His wife, geofence setup. Blows my mind.



"my wife" is Almost Certainly* explicitly flagged in his address book, either as an alias or through a "relationship" field. he didn't show you that part. (the same is likely true of the geofence, though a location-aware algorithm could probably do a better job inferring where your work is than who your wife is.)

* a term of art meaning "certainly"

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I have no problem with that. This a great demonstration of what Apple does best - optimizing products to fit the needs of most users. Google already has the voice tech in place, but often fails to follow through on the usability front. A perennially annoying example for me is when I'm on the road somewhere, bring up Maps, and ask for directions from wherever-I-am to 'home'; it doesn't know where 'home' is. This is even more annoying, because there is a 'home' tag in Maps, but it doesn't get searched on. Likewise, there's no easy way to tell it that one person is my wife, another person is my business partner, a third person is my nemesis and so on.

Apple are leveraging a culture of paying attention to detail to overcome technical handicaps, but it's hard to quantify or A/B test that, and most firms aren't comfortable with a budget line item called 'magic.'

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To add to the frustration, Google knows where "home" is for me, even without me telling - Latitude inferred it. Can't ask Google Mobile Maps for directions to home, though.

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Note: if you are nocturnal and work at an office, Google will frequently decide your office is "home" and your apartment is "work".

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For those rare cases, you can override the definitions on Latitude web site.

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yeah. I'm just saying that the magic in the system is that it's a well-designed system with attention to detail, not that it's capable of leveraging anything approaching human intuition.

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And when you leave the work radius at lunchtime with the cute coworker you're flirting with, you suddenly hear your wife over the in-vehicle bluetooth handsfree.

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I wonder how many conditionals you can string together. "Remind me to call my wife before I leave work" is great, but "remind me to call my wife before I leave work at the end of the day, unless she calls me first" would be awesome.

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> Remind me to call my wife before I leave work

Might be implemented as:

while (get_location() == work) { sleep(1min); }

go_back_in_time(10min);

trigger_reminder();

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>go_back_in_time(10min);

time.h certainly got a lot more features since the last time I used it...

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In reality none of this stuff is even remotely useful, because I can't even begin to guess whether or not a given command will be interpreted properly. Natural language is hard, and reminders need to be 100% reliable.

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> Natural language is hard, and reminders need to be 100% reliable.

Indeed; hence Apple confirming its interpretation of the reminder with you before committing anything.

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He didn't say it had a karma based interface...

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According to the video, he said that Siri knew his wife's name from "a previous conversation". Which seems to indicate that Siri has some learning capability built in.

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Out of curiousity, why on earth would you need to call your wife every time you left work..?

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There is a such thing as one-time alarms.

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