Hacker News new | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit login

I can't disagree with much of what you said. However, you are being too critical of Drupal.

"the chunks of functionality you download are not likely to match your needs perfectly, so you're forced to make due with software that's almost what you want"

Drupal starts you off with 80% of the product functionally complete (!), for free, and leaves you with the spit and polish jar to squeak out the other 20. I find that this 80/20 rule is true for even very complex products. The lazy developer will never do that remaining 20%; this says nothing about Drupal.

You can name a function according to a convention and reach into any part of Drupal, or a contributed module, to pull that specific string that you need. I'll be blasphemous and say that not having to instantiate half a dozen objects just to dive through their properties to achieve the same result -- as you would likely have to in a "proper," purely OO CMS -- is very refreshing. The result is the same and the code is readable.

"Code quality is often abysmal."

True for one out of ten new modules that I encounter; and you are free not to use those modules. The heavy weights: CCK, Views, etc. are excellent.




"Drupal starts you off with 80% of the product functionally complete (!), for free, and leaves you with the spit and polish jar to squeak out the other 20. I find that this 80/20 rule is true for even very complex products. The lazy developer will never do that remaining 20%; this says nothing about Drupal."

I agree with that statement 100%. I don't think Drupal forces you to build a half-finished site with ten security holes. My problem is that lots of people do anyway. I don't necessarily blame Drupal for this phenomenon. I just think it's emblematic of a culture of quick and dirty coding that ultimately makes life harder for professionals and our clients.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: