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Don't forget being able to do this from within the interpreter:

    >>> print abs.__doc__
    abs(number) -> number

    Return the absolute value of the argument.
    >>> print xrange.__doc__
    
    xrange([start,] stop[, step]) -> xrange object

    Like range(), but instead of returning a list, returns an object that
    generates the numbers in the range on demand.  For looping, this is 
    slightly faster than range() and more memory efficient.



True, or from your OS's shell:

    > pydoc unittest
    Help on module unittest:

    NAME
        unittest

    FILE
        /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/lib/python2.6/unittest.py

    MODULE DOCS
        http://docs.python.org/library/unittest

    DESCRIPTION
        Python unit testing framework, based on Erich Gamma's JUnit and Kent Beck's
        Smalltalk testing framework.
    
        This module contains the core framework classes that form the basis of
        specific test cases and suites (TestCase, TestSuite etc.), and also a
        text-based utility class for running the tests and reporting the results
         (TextTestRunner).
 
    [snip]

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Or from ipython, even better:

    In [1]: abs?
    Type:		builtin_function_or_method
    Base Class:	<type 'builtin_function_or_method'>
    String Form:	<built-in function abs>
    Namespace:	Python builtin
    Docstring:
       abs(number) -> number
    
    Return the absolute value of the argument.

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And:

    In [1]: import json
    
    In [2]: json.dumps??
    Type:       function
    Base Class: <type 'function'>
    String Form:<function dumps at 0x101f0bc08>
    Namespace:  Interactive
    File:       /usr/local/Cellar/python/2.7.2/lib/python2.7/json/__init__.py
    Definition: json.dumps(obj, skipkeys=False, ensure_ascii=True, check_circular=True, allow_nan=True, cls=None, indent=None, separators=None, encoding='utf-8', default=None, **kw)
    Source:
    def dumps(obj, skipkeys=False, ensure_ascii=True, check_circular=True,
            allow_nan=True, cls=None, indent=None, separators=None,
            encoding='utf-8', default=None, **kw):
        """ [snip (excellent) docstring] """
        # cached encoder
        if (not skipkeys and ensure_ascii and
            check_circular and allow_nan and
            cls is None and indent is None and separators is None and
            encoding == 'utf-8' and default is None and not kw):
            return _default_encoder.encode(obj)
    #snip rest of func

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I usually use the help function, instead of reading __docs__ directly.

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