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You know, we are near the situation when asking a girl out for a cup of coffee is perceived as an atempt to rape.



You know, we are near the situation when asking a girl out for a cup of coffee is perceived as an atempt to rape.

Honestly, if that is a regular problem for you, I would suggest you work on your interpersonal skills.


We're not at all, really, and that type of hyperbole is extremely unproductive.


"Asking a girl out for a cup of coffee" isn't perceived as an attempt to rape.

Flirting with a woman in an environment where they feel uncomfortable -- say, oh, for example, early in the morning in a confined space -- isn't perceived as an attempt to rape, but it does make the flirter an insensitive jerk at best.


We are not 'near' that point. The Rebecca Watson incident clearly demonstrates that we are already there.


1. Woman does a presentation where she talks about objectification of women in a male dominated social group.

2. Woman gets hit on in an elevator in a foreign country after leaving a bar at 4am. She declines.

3. Woman mentions incident as a "What Not To Wear" style off-hand comment in a video blog about the conference, before going on to more important things.

4. Richard Dawkins flips his shit.

5. Some men think this situation means politely asking a woman out for coffee will get you accused of rape.


Seriously?

RW said that being hit on in an elevator @ 4AM made her feel uncomfortable. That's it, and if people were able to muster up a shred of empathy and think "gee, if this makes people feel uncomfortable, I shouldn't do it", elevatorgate wouldn't have happened.

Instead, men came out of the woodwork left and right trying to defend their right to flirt on women in any situation, irrelevant of how it might make the woman feel.




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