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That's correct, although it does possess the only armed force in the world interested in protecting the Jewish people.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Entebbe for why this is important.




According to the Wikipedia page, they were separate by nationality - which happened to separate them by Jews and non-Jews. So I think that's an instance of Israel protecting their own citizens. For the record, I am Jewish by heritage, and I have zero expectation of being protected by Israel - there's even a good chance I would not be officially recognized as Jewish.


> they were separate by nationality - which happened to separate them by Jews and non-Jews

I'm not sure where you see this. There were French and American Jews who were among the hostages. In fact, the Israeli forces accidentally killed a French Jew.

> there's even a good chance I would not be officially recognized as Jewish.

If one of your grandparents is Jewish, by Israeli law, you are entitled to citizenship as a Jew.


From the article, "The hijackers deliberately sorted the hostages into two groups—Israeli nationals and others, or Jews and Gentiles." The Frenchman you mentioned lied to the hijackers, again, according to Wikipedia: "A 19-year-old Frenchman named Jean-Jacques Maimoni—who chose to identify himself as an Israeli Jew to the hijackers even though he had a French passport."

My mother converted to Judaism before I was born. I do not know if the Israeli courts would recognize that conversion. My case is weaker than some of the people profiled in this NY Times piece: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/02/magazine/02jewishness-t.ht...


Ah didn't see that about the French guy. The article isn't very explicit about this point, though if you look at the totals by nationality, there are 105 hostages (all Jews) and of them 92 are Israeli.

Also, if your mother converted to Judaism before you were born, you're 100% Jewish. The only potential sticking point would be if she was converted under Orthodox law. I am not familiar with the Rabbinate's position on that, but 99% of the Jewish world recognizes you as a Jew. Your case is quite strong as a matter of fact.


Yes, for most reasonable Jews. My point there was that the process is not reasonable, as evidenced by the people who get caught up in it.


Yes I agree completely. The Rabbinate should not have as much power as it does.


Depends on which side, from the mother side by law you'll receive nationality on the spot, from the father's side you'll only experience the brutal pain of the politics in Israel.




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