Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit login

Actually your theory about Thiel matches mine. In fact several months ago I noted on HN that we'll see a full attack on academia by the right through the 2012 election. Some of it overt, but much of it subtle, e.g., it's not our intellect that makes us a great country, but rather something no one can accurately measure, like our ability to empathize.

Regarding his politics, he's given multiple accomodating interviews to National Review, the founding conservative magazine in the US. And you can just look at his public donation record -- it's more than a quarter of a million dollars -- 100% Republican.

Of course he won't come out and say, "I'm trying to dismantle higher education as part of a larger political agenda", but at least to some (including myself), the evidence is striking.




I find it really disingenuous to paint someone as intelligent and quirky as Thiel with the "bah, republican" brush. In terms of where he's putting his money, bear in mind that he's a multi-billionaire; donating a quarter million for him is not a substantial capital commitment.

I wouldn't even call Thiel's goals fundamentally political; he's trying to shape society and throws money at things that he believes will bend it more to his liking. I don't think he gives two shits about the survival of either of the dominant American political parties.

-----


donating a quarter million for him is not a substantial capital commitment.

Most of his donations were the maximum allowed by US law.

I wouldn't even call Thiel's goals fundamentally political

You don't work with the National Review, the Cato Institute, and consistently donate (and to only one political party) if its not fundamentally political.

he's trying to shape society and throws money at things that he believes will bend it more to his liking.

Umm, yeah, that's what all politicians are doing. My point is is that he's working through and with the conservative political system to make this happen, as their goals are aligned.

Take someone like Salman Khan, OTOH, who is also trying to make a big change, but seems to be taking a much less political approach.

-----


90+% of Google's political donations go to a single party. Is their business fundamentally political?

[1] http://money.cnn.com/2005/02/14/technology/google_democrats/

-----


First, I don't think this link proves that Google is political, because that link is about their employees. That link just greatly increases the chances that Google's employees are political, in this case democratic.

Second, I think I'm using the word political here to talk about ideological interests, rather than self-interested ones.

But let me presume that link was about the actual company donating to the democrats. Setting aside the issue of Thiel, because I don't know much about him, I think its harder to classify businesses as 'fundamentally political' because of their more singular motive of profit. Businesses, at least those on a massive scale like Google, have a clear goal in mind when donating to candidates: procuring legislation in favor of themselves. Thus, their choice doesn't seem 'political' because it can be boiled down to self-interest. If they were giving lots of money to democrats, it could probably be explained by the democrats being more easily 'bought' on something Google wanted. I wouldn't say that an oil company is 'political' for giving money to republicans instead of environmentally conscious democrats--that's just self-interest to me.

Meanwhile, I think a person donating is much more likely to be doing so because of ideological reasons. However, the greater a person's stake in the outcome of legislation, the more likely their motive is not 'political'. For example, if billionaires don't want a crackdown on tax havens, its probably because of self-interest rather than some ideological commitment that taxation is unjust. Given this, Thiel's donation record alone could just be evidence of self-interest. However, as per the posts around this discussion, frequent interviews with the National Review, Cato, etc., plus the fact that I think its much more probable that individuals are political than companies, makes me think that the Google/Thiel comparison is inaccurate.

-----


Do they also provide a disproportionate amount of airtime to Mother Jones and the American Prospect? Are they also aggressively pursuing an agenda that people have explicitly described as "liberal".

It's not one thing, but its the combination of his apparent agenda coupled with his background.

With that said, if Google decided to promote planned parenthood links and hid southern baptist links, then I'd probably believe that politics might have something to do with it.

Everyone has a bias. But its important that you be able to see through their front to see what might be their actual end goal that's consistent with their bias.

-----


Have you considered the possibility that regardless of his other views, Peter Thiel may genuinely think that college is not for everyone?

I.e., don't you think it's possible that his individualist, pro-free thinker views inform both his libertarian political views and also his views that our rigid college-based gatekeeping system is unnecessary?

-----


I.e., don't you think it's possible that his individualist, pro-free thinker views inform both his libertarian political views and also his views that our rigid college-based gatekeeping system is unnecessary?

Probably not since one doesn't naturally flow from the other. Especially since he creates and participates in a several other gatekeeping systems.

Peter Thiel as a libertarian is depressed simply because, despte being white and rich, he can't find a way to deprive other groups of some basic civil rights. What freedom do you have if you can't deprive others of theirs? Indeed Mr. Thiel.

-----


What freedom do you have if you can't deprive others of theirs? Indeed Mr. Thiel.

If you are making statements like this, you clearly know nothing about either libertarianism or Peter Thiel.

-----


Also, someone just submitted this link to HN:

http://www.newsweek.com/2010/10/18/what-s-wrong-with-silicon...

Some nice quotes from Thiel:

“I no longer believe that freedom and democracy are compatible.”

“Since 1920, the vast increase in welfare beneficiaries and the extension of the franchise to women—two constituencies that are notoriously tough for libertarians—have rendered the notion of ‘capitalist democracy’ into an oxymoron,”

And a quote from the article: "The public, he [Thiel] says, doesn’t support unregulated, winner-take-all capitalism, and so he won’t support the public any longer. "

"Thiel is the lead backer of Sea-steading, a movement to create law-free floating communes and explore space, with the avowed aim of creating new POLITICAL structures even farther offshore. "

I don't see how its not obvious that Thiel's motives have an extreme conservative ideological bent. "The extension of the franchise to women" -- WTF?!

And I should have looked on Wikipedia earlier "he founded The Stanford Review, now the university's main conservative/libertarian newspaper".

What else do you need?

-----


I was aware of all of the things you mentioned when I made my comment.

You're conflating a whole mess of things: "conservative", "Republican" and "Libertarian" are all different. The only one of those three that can Thiel can be meaningfully labeled is libertarian. He's a couple orders of magnitude further away from Republicans than most Democrats. His political views are radical and outspoken, but "Republican" they are not.

Second, it's silly to assume that someone as prolific as Thiel does everything for an ulterior political motive (investing in Facebook, Zynga, life extension, running a hedge fund?) or that even those that do conform to some pre-fabricated ideology. His views are sufficiently distant from the norm that I find it overwhelmingly clear that he thinks independently on separate issues. If you want to label the lump sum of a person's ideals "political", then sure, they're "political", but that definition isn't particularly useful. The more conventional definition of "political" would be "having to do with governmental politics", and if anything his ideology is anti-political.

Your comment was ad hominem -- you made no attempt to actually draw a connection between this program and his purported political agenda and instead chose to go after the fact that he donated to republicans and gave interviews to the Cato Institute. That's what was disingenuous. That he's a libertarian is obvious; that this act was part of some effort to undermine the universities because of his "conservatism" is not.

-----


you made no attempt to actually draw a connection between this program and his purported political agenda

Unfortunately you missed the complete premise of my position. His act, the creation of his fund, is inherently conservative. And furthermore, it's something I had long predicted as part of the conservative movement (with ample help from those in the movement saying they were planning on doing such a thing).

I didn't work from Thiel's ideologoy forward. I heard about the act and my first thought, before even originally knowing who did it was that it would be a prominent conservative. I was not shocked to see it was Mr. Thiel. At that point the rest of the pieces fit together perfectly.

You can attempt to downplay Thiel's ideological motivation, but only the most diehard conservatives (of which there are plenty on HN) will disagree.

-----




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Y Combinator | Apply | Contact

Search: